Found 584 Documents across 59 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. A cross cultural study of sex gender and social structureMunroe, Robert L. - Ethnology, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    Authors hypothesize that grammatical sex gender may be related to social structural variables. Results support this hypothesis and suggest that the degree of sex bias in the social structure is associated with the relative frequency of masculine and feminine nouns in languages with sex gender.

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  2. Cultural patterning of sexual beliefs and behaviorMinturn, Leigh - Ethnology, 1969 - 12 Hypotheses

    This paper is concerned with the variation in sexual behavior in humans. Authors test hypotheses regarding the relationships between sexual behaviors and beliefs concerning sex.

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  3. The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypothesesMinturn, Leigh - Mothers of six cultures: antecedents of child rearing, 1964 - 5 Hypotheses

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  4. The cultural consequences of female contribution to subsistenceSchlegel, Alice - American Anthropologist, 1986 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study relates female contributions to a variety of social variables. The author divides responses to high female contribution to subsistence into two categories: adaptive (i.e. increased exogamy, polygyny, and bridewealth) and attitudinal (i.e. increased valuation of girls and premarital permissiveness). It is proposed that where women contribute more, “they are perceived less as objects for male sexual and reproductive needs and more as a person in their own right” (149).

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  5. Language structure is partly determined by social structureLupyan, Gary - PLoS ONE, 2010 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationship between language structure and social environment, positing that linguistic factors such as morphological complexity are associated with demographic/socio-historical factors such as number of speakers, geographic spread, and degree of language contact. Data support such an association. The authors further propose a Linguistic Niche Hypothesis suggesting that “the level of morphological specialization is a product of languages adapting to the learning constraints and the unique communicative needs of the speaker population” (7).

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  6. Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedureMinturn, Leigh - Cross-Cultural Research, 1982 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

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  7. The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural studyMinturn, Leigh - Medical Anthropology, 1984 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  8. Languages in Drier Climates Use Fewer VowelsEverett, Caleb - Frontiers in Psychology, 2017 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study sampled over 4,012 language varieties, comparing their version of 40 generally universal words, such as body parts, water, the sun, pronouns, and common behaviors or animals. These language variations were tested in their association to "specific humidity," the variable used to represent ambient humidity of a language location. Results suggest negative association between the dryness of climate and the utilization of vowels, consitent with the idea that dry air affects the behavior of the larynx.

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  9. Naming the days of the week: a cross-language study of lexical acculturationBrown, Cecil H. - Current Anthropology, 1989 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper provides a linguistic study of the effect of lexical acculturation on the names given to days of the week. Findings show that loan words are used most frequently adopted for weekend days, followed by the days of the week that are closest to the weekends, and least frequently adopted for the days in the middle of the seven-day cycle.

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  10. Sources of frustration and targets of aggression: a cross-cultural studyTriandis, Leigh Minturn - Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1961 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the relationships between culturally defined frustrating agents and various types of culturally defined targets of aggressive response. Findings indicate relationships between extrapunitive outlook and extrapunitive responsiveness and impunitive outlook and impunitive responsiveness.

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