Found 678 Documents across 68 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Social structural expansion, economic diversification, and concentration of emphases in childhood socialization: a preliminary test of value transmission hypothesesWelch, Michael R. - Ethos, 1984 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the relationship between economic type and socialization of children. The author focuses on the concentration of value emphases in childhood socialization--that is, whether children are instilled with several different value orientations rather than just one or two. Value concentration is examined alongside subsistence technology and economic diversification; attention is also paid to gender differences.

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  2. Childhood socialization differences in african and nonafrican societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study compares child socialization emphases in African and non-African societies. Results show that differences in child socialization are neglibible.

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  3. Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency of child training processes in preindustrial societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  4. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  5. Sex differences in socialization anxietyWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1979 - 7 Hypotheses

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  6. Socialization anxiety and patterns of economic subsistenceWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines variation in childrens' socialization anxiety across societies of different subsistence types.

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  7. Behavioural variation in 172 small-scale societies indicates that social learning is the main mode of human adaptationMathew, Sarah - Proc. R. Soc. B, 2015 - 8 Hypotheses

    Inter-group variation is greater in humans than in any other animal, and scholars continue to debate the cause of this diversity. Two competing explanatory models of human variation emphasize either (1) ecological differences and "evoked" culture or (2) population-level effects of cultural transmission. The former emphasizes mechanisms that operate within a single generation, while the latter emphasizes cumulative cultural history operating over many generations. To test these competing models, the authors measured the relative power of ecological variables as compared to culture history to predict behavioral variation in 172 western North American tribes. Culture history is subdivided into culture phylogeny (based on language phylogeny) and spatial distance.

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  8. Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial SocietiesFrederic L. Pryor - , 2005 - 26 Hypotheses

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  9. How marginal are forager habitats?Porter, Claire C. - Journal of Archaeological Science, 2007 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the quality of forager habitats to determine whether agriculturalists occupy the most productive areas while modern forager groups are relegated to poor habitats. Findings indicate that there are slight but insignificant differences in the net primary productivity of foragers’ land and agriculturalists’ land. Further analysis of types of agriculturalists suggest that horticulturalists live in the most productive habitats, followed by intensive agriculturalists and finally pastoralists.

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  10. Economy and child training reexaminedHendrix, Lewellyn - Ethos, 1985 - 0 Hypotheses

    This study provides a reexamination of research by Barry, Bacon, and Child (1857) and Barry, Child, and Bacon (1959) on subsistence type and child socialization. Many of the previous findings are not challenged, however a factor analysis indicates that the composite indices used by the original authors lack internal validity. Results suggest that, although previous findings were not entirely inaccurate, the original conclusions were overly simplified and misleading.

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