Found 626 Documents across 63 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. Social structureMurdock, George Peter - , 1949 - 41 Hypotheses

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  2. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  3. Male dominance and female autonomy: domestic authority in matrilineal societiesSchlegel, Alice - , 1972 - 15 Hypotheses

    This book examines male and female power in various kinship configurations. Variables for male dominance and female autonomy are associated with various political and social variables, such as political complexity and co-wife jealousy. Several hypotheses are supported.

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  4. The avunculate: a cross-cultural critique of Claude Levi-StraussRyder, James W. - Behavior Science Notes, 1970 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors test Levi-Strauss' theory of the avunculate, a special relationship between a mother's brother and his sister's son. They critique the theory on the grounds that many societies have a special relationship that could be called the avunculate but lack the other relationships predicted by Levi-Strauss.

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  5. Avoidance, social affiliation, and the incest tabooSweetser, Dorrian Apple - Ethnology, 1966 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines parent-in-law avoidance in non-industrial societies. The author suggests that in-law avoidance is associated with characteristics of kinship structure, such as lineality, residence and family type. A psychological interpretation is also offered. Results support hypotheses relating to kinship structure.

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  6. Cultural patterning of sexual beliefs and behaviorMinturn, Leigh - Ethnology, 1969 - 12 Hypotheses

    This paper is concerned with the variation in sexual behavior in humans. Authors test hypotheses regarding the relationships between sexual behaviors and beliefs concerning sex.

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  7. A cross-cultural test of the proximity hypothesisWitkowski, Stanley - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper tests the proximity hypothesis (used by Murdock [1949]) which posits that residential propinquity will be associated with parent-in-law avoidance and kin terminology. Several operational hypotheses are tested but none are supported. The author suggests that this finding may cast doubt other hypotheses that underlie Murdock’s findings, such as the participation hypothesis.

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  8. Male-female relationships in cross-cultural perspective: a study of sex and intimacyBroude, Gwen J. - Behavior Science Research, 1983 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study explores the extent to which heterosexual sex, love, and intimacy are interrelated and the degree to which the sexual revolution has had a positive or negative impact on male-female relationships. The author employs a correlation matrix to examine the interrelationships of several variables related to aloofness and intimacy in the sexual and non-sexual aspects of heterosexual relationships. Results suggest that the sexual revolution has had some positive effects on male-female relationships, but also that sexual behavior does not predict the degree to which marriages are intimate or aloof. Results also show little support for the hypothesis that marital aloofness is related to hypermasculinity.

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  9. Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral SystemsEnke, Benjamin - The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2019 - 10 Hypotheses

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  10. Evolutionary Models of LeadershipGarfield, Zachary H. - Human Nature, 2019 - 4 Hypotheses

    Researchers tested four models of leadership for qualities and correlates that could predict the transmission of leadership cross-culturally. Researchers sampled 60 societies from the Probability Sample Files, coding for 24 variables. Support was found for the prevalence of the collective action model and the prestige model, with a lack of support found for the dominance leadership model.

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