Found 839 Documents across 84 Pages (0.012 seconds)
  1. Cross-sex patterns of kin behaviorMurdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1971 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study re-examines patterns of cross-sex kin relationships using new ethnographic data. The author looks specifically at cross-sex kin relationship in relation to marriage rules.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Cousin termsGoody, Jack - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1970 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses related to kinship terms, cousin marriage, and descent rules. Omaha, Crow, Eskimo, and Iroquois systems are each significantly associated with different kinship rules. Material from Northern Ghana is also considered.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Kin-avoidanceStephens, William N. - The Oedipus Complex: Cross-Cultural Evidence, 1962 - 3 Hypotheses

    The authors test the male Oedipus complex hypothesis with a prediction suggesting that the scale of kin-avoidance is related to "a phobic attitude towards incest" (129).

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Social structureMurdock, George Peter - , 1949 - 41 Hypotheses

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Bridewealth and dowry in Africa and EurasiaGoody, Jack - Bridewealth and Dowry, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This chapter considers several forms of wealth transmission at marriage. The relationships between descent rules and incidence of bridewealth, dowry, and gift exchange are examined and several patterns emerge from empirical analysis.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Sideways or downwards? Lateral and vertical succession, inheritance and descent in africa and eurasiaGoody, Jack - Man, n.s., 1970 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines direction of succession and inheritance as they relate to culture area and kinship system. Several hypotheses are presented and all are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Male dominance and female autonomy: domestic authority in matrilineal societiesSchlegel, Alice - , 1972 - 15 Hypotheses

    This book examines male and female power in various kinship configurations. Variables for male dominance and female autonomy are associated with various political and social variables, such as political complexity and co-wife jealousy. Several hypotheses are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. A cross-cultural test of the proximity hypothesisWitkowski, Stanley - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper tests the proximity hypothesis (used by Murdock [1949]) which posits that residential propinquity will be associated with parent-in-law avoidance and kin terminology. Several operational hypotheses are tested but none are supported. The author suggests that this finding may cast doubt other hypotheses that underlie Murdock’s findings, such as the participation hypothesis.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Avoidance, social affiliation, and the incest tabooSweetser, Dorrian Apple - Ethnology, 1966 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines parent-in-law avoidance in non-industrial societies. The author suggests that in-law avoidance is associated with characteristics of kinship structure, such as lineality, residence and family type. A psychological interpretation is also offered. Results support hypotheses relating to kinship structure.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. The transition from childhood to adolescence: cross-cultural studies of initiation ceremonies, legal systems, and incest taboosCohen, Yehudi A. - , 1964 - 4 Hypotheses

    The theoretical concern of this work is with different types of liability that societies emphasize in their legal systems and how that plays out in understanding the transition from childhood to adolescence as well as variation in incest taboos.

    Related DocumentsCite