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  1. A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of cultureBacon, Margaret K. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Suppl., 1965 - 12 Hypotheses

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  2. Cross-cultural research with matched pairs of societiesBarry III, Herbert - Journal of Social Psychology, 1969 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study examines 12 matched pairs of closely related societies and suggests that there is a relationship between socialization pressure toward compliance (rather than assertion) and emphasis on food production. Results also indicate that stronger compliance training is associated with higher indulgence in infancy and lower frequency of drunkenness in adulthood.

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  3. Relationships among selected child-rearing variables in a cross-cultural sample of 110 societiesZern, David - Developmental Psychology, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines child-training through children's display of individualistic orientations (self-reliance, achievement, and general independence) and/or group orientations (responsibility, nurturance, and obedience). Five sub-categories measure whether each orientation is linked to a child's experience of general pressure or performance anxiety/conflict. Together, these orientations their sub-categories total 30 variables that were correlated; differences in gender were also examined. Results indicate that child-rearing pressure to act one way predicts pressure to act in other ways, and this pattern of interaction between variables did not vary by gender.

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  4. Instrumental and expressive socialization: a false dichotomyHendrix, Lewellyn - Sex Roles, 1985 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study reanalyzes the work of Barry, Bacon and Child (1957) on sex differences in child socialization. The authors use factor analysis to determine if the results of the original study are consistent with results yielded using modern methods and computer analysis. Authors find that there is no one general dimension of male-female difference in socialization and that the conclusions of Barry, Bacon, and Child have little meaning.

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  5. Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency of child training processes in preindustrial societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  6. Childhood socialization differences in african and nonafrican societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study compares child socialization emphases in African and non-African societies. Results show that differences in child socialization are neglibible.

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  7. A cross-cultural study of correlates of crimeBacon, Margaret K. - Journal of Abnormal and social Psychology, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    Causal factors to the development of crime are examined. Frequency of theft and personal crime are tested against these causal factors in a search for correlations.

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  8. Possible rhinencephalic influences on human maternal behavior: a cross-cultural studyHines, Dwight - , 1974 - 7 Hypotheses

    Authors study the correlation between maternal behavior and reference to odors in folktales. They find several significant relationships between odor references in folk tales, maternal behavior, and various aspects of infant and child socialization.

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  9. A cross-cultural study of drunkennessDavis, William N. - , 1964 - 18 Hypotheses

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  10. A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differencesChild, Irvin L. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1965 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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