Found 843 Documents across 85 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Conjugal power and spousal resources in patriarchal culturesLee, Gary R. - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1983 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article reviews theories of marital power and tests for a relationship between wives’ contribution to subsistence and their conjugal power in patriarchal cultures. Results indicate a positive association. The role of cultural complexity is also considered; its relationship with wives’ power is negative and linear while its relationship with wives’ contribution to subsistence is negative and non-linear.

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  2. Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structureLee, Gary R. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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  3. Status of the elderly: economic and familial antecedentsLee, Gary R. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how status of the elderly is affected by economic type, family organization, inheritance of real property, and unilocal residence patterns. Multivariate analysis ultimately suggests that agricultural economy, patrilocal residence, and fully extended family systems are significant predictors of higher status of the elderly. No major gender differences were discovered.

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  4. Family structure and the status of the elderly: a preliminary empirical studyLee, Gary R. - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1979 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines the status of the elderly cross-culturally, proposing that familial complexity, unlineal descent, and unilocal residence are predictors of high status. The authors theorize that elderly male status will be highest in patrilineal and patrilocal societies; elderly female status will be highest in matrilineal and matrilocal societies. Some support is found for these patterns, but the authors ultimately regard them as too simple to adequately predict status of the elderly.

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  5. Sex, coalitions, and politics in preindustrial societiesLow, Bobbi S. - Politics and the Life Sciences, 1992 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates possible correlates of women’s overt political power in a cross-cultural sample. Rule of descent—specifically, matrilineal or double descent— is the only factor the author found to be associated with women’s overt political power. Several other factors, including sex ratio, subsistence type, contribution to subsistence, and political system, are not associated. The author also includes a discussion of political activity among chimpanzees, as well as a brief ethnographic summary of several societies in which women have political power.

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  6. A worldwide view of matriliny: using cross-cultural analyses to shed light on human kinship systemsSurowiec, Alexandra - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 2019 - 10 Hypotheses

    This article tested multiple previous hypotheses for associations between matriliny and cultural traits typically associated with stability and loss (subsistence strategy, animal domestication, mating system, residence pattern, wealth transfer, and property succession). Combining both genetic and linguistic data, researchers formed a phylogenetic ‘supertree’ that includes 16 matrilineal populations. Using this dataset they performed various analyses to assess patterns of evolution of matriliny and matrilocality.

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  7. Notes on technology and the moral orderGouldner, Alvin W. - The Advanced Studies Series, 1962 - 7 Hypotheses

    Using empirical data and statistical methodology, Gouldner and Peterson aim to identify fundamental dimensions across societies, examine the relationships among these dimensions, and evaluate their importance. Data analysis is largely based on factor analysis, and the authors discuss how statistical methods fit into functional social theory.

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  8. A cross-cultural test of Nancy Jay's theory about women, sacrificial blood and religious participationFink, Virginia S. - Journal of International Women's Studies, 2004 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the restriction of women in religious ritual, focusing on cultural traits that favor men's power. Results suggest that patrilineality and male inheritance correlate with the restriction of women’s participation in ritual.

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  9. Quality and equality in marriage: a cross-cultural viewHendrix, Lewellyn - Cross-Cultural Research, 1997 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article presents a review of the scholarly work relating to marital quality. Cross-cultural testing of various predictors of marital qualtiy are presented singlely as well as multiple regression analyses.

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  10. Female allies and female power a cross-cultural analysisYanca, Catherine - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2004 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests the various ecological and social influences of women's political power and resource control in polygynous societies cross-culturally. Results suggest that women who are closer to their kin and have sisters as cowives are more likely to have resource control and power.

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