Found 891 Documents across 90 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Residential variation among hunter-gatherersEmber, Carol R. - Behavior Science Research, 1975 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study explores predictors of variation in two dimensions of marital residence patterns among hunter-gatherers: 1) the tendency toward patrilocality versus matrilocality and 2) the tendency toward unilocality versus bilocality.

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  2. On the development of unilineal descentEmber, Carol R. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1974 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article tests some conditions that may lead to the emergence of unilineal descent, focusing on unilocality and warfare. Unilineal descent is thought to be likely in a unilocal society without a centralized political system that is experiencing intra- or inter-societal warfare. The authors also posit that a "clan" system usually develops prior to a "lineage" system.

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  3. War, peace, and marital residence in pre-industrial societiesDivale, William Tulio - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1976 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article tests a series of hypotheses differentiating internal warfare and external warfare. Results support the theory that internal warfare is a population control mechanism more common in patrilocal societies, whereas external warfare occurs between two societies, one of which recently migrated and adopted matrilocal residence. Based on these findings, the authors assert that internal warfare can be regulated while external warfare cannot.

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  4. The causes of matrilocal residence: a cross-ethnohistorical surveyDivale, William Tulio - , 1974 - 20 Hypotheses

    Author proposes and presents evidence in support of the theory that most societies practice virilocal or patrilocal residence (this is the "normal" pattern" and that matrilocal residence is adopted when societies migrate to an already populated area.

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  5. Warfare, atrocities, and political participation: eastern AfricaEmber, Carol R. - Journal of Aggression, Conflict, and Peace Research, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    The present study attempts to replicate the Ember, Ember, and Russett (1992) worldwide finding that fighting rarely occurs between democracies in a sample of eastern African societies. Following the earlier study, the authors considered internal warfare to be an analog of international warfare and measures of political participation analogous to democracy. The researchers also explore if there is an association between political participation and committing atrocities. Contrary to past findings, internal warfare was not predicted by the same set of variables as the 1992 study, but there is an inverse relationship between committing atrocities and political participation. However, when additional variables were added, internal warfare was significantly predicted by less political participation.

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  6. Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on war and aggressionEmber, Carol R. - Troubled Times: Violence and Warfare in the Past, 1997 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  7. Migration, external warfare, and matrilocal residenceDivale, William Tulio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1974 - 3 Hypotheses

    Several theories on the development of matrilocal residence are tested. The main argument put forth predicts that matrilocal residence will develop in response to a need to break up fraternal interest groups that encourage internal war and instead encourage a pattern of external war that is more beneficial in populated regions with additional group migration.

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  8. The conditions favoring matrilocal versus patrilocal residenceEmber, Melvin - American Anthropologist, 1971 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study analyzes several variables that influence matrilocal versus patrilocal residence. Results indicate that the traditional assumption that division of labor determines residence was not supported. Rather, results suggest that internal warfare favors partilocal residence and matrilocal residence is favored by purely external warfare if division of labor is matridominant.

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  9. Father absence and male aggression: a re-examination of the comparative evidenceEmber, Carol R. - Ethos, 2002 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper supports Beatrice B. Whiting's (1965) sex-identity conflict hypothesis which suggests a relationship between males' early identification with their mothers and male violence. Authors find that, in addition to socialization aggression, frequency of homicide/assault is significantly related to father-infant sleeping distance, particularly when residence is not matrilocal and/or warfare is more than occasional.

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  10. Resource Unpredictability, mistrust, and war: a cross-cultural studyEmber, Carol R. - The Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1992 - 6 Hypotheses

    The article tests theories that may explain why warfare frequency varies from society to society. The focus is on ecological problems, particularly different kinds of resource scarcity, but social and psychological theories are also tested with both bivariate and multivariate analyses. Because unpredictable disasters are such a strong predictor in nonstate societies, the authors theorize that war may mostly be caused by a fear of nature.

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