Found 523 Documents across 53 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. The origins of moneyPryor, Frederic L. - Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, 1977 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines the origin of money. Anthropologists’ and economists’ theories are discussed and data supports a broad hypothesis that the existence of money is associated with level of economic development. The author further examines the emergence of internal, external, commercial and noncommercial moneys at high and low levels of economic development.

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  2. The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive and peasant economiesPryor, Frederic L. - , 1977 - 39 Hypotheses

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  3. Explaining corporal punishment of children: a cross-cultural studyEmber, Carol R. - American Anthropologist, 2005 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article tests various explainations for corporal punishment of children, including social complexity, a societal culture of violence, and whether help in child rearing is available. Analysis suggests that corporal punishment may be a parent's way to prepare children for societal power inequality.

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  4. Gender-based social groupsEmber, Carol R. - Encyclopedia of Sex and Gender, 2003 - 0 Hypotheses

    This article reviews the literature referring to patterns of marital residence. Discussions include the psychological consequences for the individuals involved, variations in marital residence patterns, explanations of the types of kin or descent groups developed in response to varying marital residence patterns, unisex associations, and consequences of gender-based social organizations.

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  5. My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply]Weisner, Thomas S. - Current Anthropology, 1977 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  6. On the development of unilineal descentEmber, Carol R. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1974 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article tests some conditions that may lead to the emergence of unilineal descent, focusing on unilocality and warfare. Unilineal descent is thought to be likely in a unilocal society without a centralized political system that is experiencing intra- or inter-societal warfare. The authors also posit that a "clan" system usually develops prior to a "lineage" system.

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  7. The conditions favoring multilocal residenceEmber, Carol R. - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1972 - 5 Hypotheses

    This paper presents empirical evidence suggesting that multilocal residence is most common in societies that have experienced depopulation, likely due to the introduction of a new infectious disease. Other potential explanatory variables—such as the presence of migratory bands, little or no agriculture, and equality of the sexes in inheritance—were not significant predictors of multilocal residence when controlling for depopulation.

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  8. Types of family and types of economyNimkoff, M. F. - American Journal of Sociology, 1960 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article posits that nuclear, independent families are more common under certain economic conditions that affect food supply, demand for family labor, physical mobility, and property system. Empirical analysis suggests that nuclear, independent families are associated with hunting and gathering subsistence type and low social stratification.

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  9. Resource Unpredictability, mistrust, and war: a cross-cultural studyEmber, Carol R. - The Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1992 - 6 Hypotheses

    The article tests theories that may explain why warfare frequency varies from society to society. The focus is on ecological problems, particularly different kinds of resource scarcity, but social and psychological theories are also tested with both bivariate and multivariate analyses. Because unpredictable disasters are such a strong predictor in nonstate societies, the authors theorize that war may mostly be caused by a fear of nature.

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  10. Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structureLee, Gary R. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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