Found 933 Documents across 94 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. The role of the aged in primitive societySimmons, Leo W. - , 1945 - 15 Hypotheses

    Explores 109 traits relating primarily to physical habitat, economy, political and social organization, and religion, to see how they relate to the role and treatment of the aged. General patterns were sought. Numerous ethnographic examples are given.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. GerontocideMaxwell, Robert J. - The Content of Culture: Constants and Variants, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines correlates of gerontrocide. Previously suggested predictors, such as nomadism and harsh climate, were not found to be associated with gerontrocide, but data suggested that several other variables such as social stratification, subsistence type, and rule of descent, are significant predictors.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Respect for the elderly in preindustrial societies as related to their activityMcArdle, Joan L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1981 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between respect for the elderly and their socially valued activities. Support is found for this association under certain conditions: it is significant with independent families in societies with no belief in a single god and absence of slavery. Theories of disengagement and activity among the elderly are also discussed, and the authors propose that they be considered as a continuum.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Senior esteem as a factor of socioeconomic complexitySheehan, Tom - The Gerontologist, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the treatment and position of elderly persons cross-culturally, proposing an association with society type. Analysis suggests that semisedentary or seminomadic peoples treat seniors with lower esteem while nucleated peasant communities treat seniors with more esteem. Esteem is defined as "the intersection of decision-making role or resource control and quality of received behavior" (433).

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. How do I respect thee? let me count the ways: deference towards elderly men and womenSilverman, Philip - Behavior Science Research, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article describes categories of deference toward elderly men and women. The authors test for significant differences in the types of deference elderly men and women enjoy, finding that men experience more victual and linguistic deference. Elderly women enjoy more service deference than men, but the difference is not significant.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Social asset or social burden: treatment of the aged in non-industrial societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Dimensions: Aging, Culture, and Health, 1981 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article uses cross-cultural methodology to examine the classification and treatment of the aged. Results suggest that the combination of supportive/unsupportive treatment is associated with the intact/decrepit age grouping.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Tightness-looseness across the 50 united statesHarrington, Jesse R. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014 - 4 Hypotheses

    Authors contend that many of the differences across the 50 states can be attributed to the degree to which social entities are "tight" (have many strongly enforced rules and little tolerance to deviance) or "loose" (have few strongly enforced rules and greater tolerance for deviance). Significant correlations were found between many state characteristics and tightness-looseness.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Slavery as a system of production in tribal societyBaks, C. - Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, 1966 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the conditions under which slavery occurs in preindustrial societies. Results suggest that social stratification and the existence of open resources are both necessary conditions for the occurrence of slavery.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. The myth of the golden isle: old age in pre-industrial societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Selected Papers Volume of the 8th International Congress of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1987 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study discusses the distribution of the treatment of the aged across a sample of pre-industrial societies. Data illustrate that the elderly were treated in a non-supportive or death-hastening manner in the majority of societies, dispelling the notion that a golden age/isle existed in pre-industrial societies in which the elderly were revered and supported. Results also suggest a relationship between age and treatment of the elderly and climate, social, and subsistence variables and the treatment of the aged.

    Related DocumentsCite