Found 886 Documents across 89 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Relation of child training to subsistence economyBarry III, Herbert - American Anthropologist, 1959 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article discusses the relationship between child training and certain variables, such as economy.

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  2. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  3. The role of the aged in primitive societySimmons, Leo W. - , 1945 - 15 Hypotheses

    Explores 109 traits relating primarily to physical habitat, economy, political and social organization, and religion, to see how they relate to the role and treatment of the aged. General patterns were sought. Numerous ethnographic examples are given.

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  4. A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differencesChild, Irvin L. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1965 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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  5. Personality and subsistence: is the child the parent of the person?Cone, Cynthia A. - Ethnology, 1979 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between personality traits and subsistence type in mixed farming and pastoralists societies. Findings suggest that differences in child socialization do not significantly predict personality differences in mixed farming and pastoralist societies as much as one would expect. Adult experiences should be considered as better predictors of personality traits.

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  6. Infant socialization and games of chanceBarry III, Herbert - Ethnology, 1972 - 14 Hypotheses

    This paper explores the relationship between games of chance and various aspects of infant socialization, as well as subsistence economy and social organization. Several significant associations were found between these variables.

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  7. Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of social controlWhiting, John W.M. - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  8. Initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural study of status dramatizationYoung, Frank W. - , 1965 - 13 Hypotheses

    This book investigates a broad hypothesis linking social solidarity and initiation ceremonies. The author proposes that “the degree of solidarity of a given social system determines the degree to which status transitions within it will be dramatized” (1). A variety of operational hypotheses are supported for both male and female initiation ceremonies.

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  9. A typology of social structure and the patterning of social institutions: a cross-cultural studySpiro, Melford E. - American Anthropologist, 1965 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article attempts to construct an empirically-based typology of social structure. Marital structure, government, food production, and stratification are among the factors considered.

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  10. Typology and patterning: Spiro's sample re-examinedChaney, Richard P. - American Anthropologist, 1966 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article suggests that Spiro's (1965) study on typology of social structure used a biased cross-cultural sample and possibly obscured regional patterns in data. Hypotheses related to marital structure, descent rules, food production and social stratification are tested.

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