Found 995 Documents across 100 Pages (0.035 seconds)
  1. The relation between discipline experiences and the expression of aggressionLester, David - American Anthropologist, 1967 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates the relationship between discipline experiences in preindustrial societies and aggressive behavior at the societal level. No associations are found between discipline experiences and suicide, murder, aggression resulting from alcohol consumption, or aggression expressed in war-making.

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  2. The fear of death in primitive societiesLester, David - Science Research, 1975 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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  3. National motives and psychogenic death ratesLester, David - Science, 1968 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  4. Suicide and mutilation behaviors in non-literate societiesLester, David - Psychological Reports, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper tests for a relationship between practices of mutilation and self-torture and the incidence of suicidal behavior in preindustrial, nonliterate societies. Several hypotheses are tested but none supported.

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  5. The incidence of suicide and the fear of the dead in non-literate societiesLester, David - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study tests for an association between suicide rates and cultural fear of the dead. Tests do not support a significant relationship.

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  6. Population density in cross-cultural perspectiveLevinson, David - American Ethnologist, 1979 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how population density affects social behavior, particularly whether it is a cause of stress in humans that manifests in pathological behavior or mistreatment of children. Analysis indicates that population density is not a cause of these behaviors, and with some variables (such as with divorce and sexual anxiety), there is a negative association with population density.

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  7. Adolescent suicide and premarital sexual behaviorLester, David - Journal of Social Psychology, 1970 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between adolescent suicide and attitudes toward premarital sexual behavior. Several hypotheses were tested, but no associations reached statistical significance.

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  8. The relationship of certain group-oriented and individualistically oriented child-rearing dimensions to cultural complexity in a cross-cultural sampleZern, David - Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1983 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article tests the relationship between child-training variables and cultural complexity. Attention is paid to different types of socialization pressure (group-oriented versus individual-oriented; the degree of anxiety created by the pressure). Findings suggest that group-oriented socialization promotes societal complexity, but individual-oriented socialization and pressure-induced anxiety do not.

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  9. The fear of the dead in nonliterate societiesLester, David - Journal of Social Psychology, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors hypothesizes that fear of the dead will be correlated with an emphasis on achievement and affiliation in folk tales. Results do not support this hypothesis.

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  10. Physical punishment of children and wifebeating in cross-cultural perspectiveLevinson, David - Child Abuse and Neglect, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author tests Straus' model of wifebeating that suggests that socialization through violence (by encouraging aggression, corporal punishment and by observing violence) increases the likelihood of wifebeating. The relationship between socialization of children using violent techniques and wifebeating is tested using the Probability Sample Files.

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