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  1. An additional warfare element in territorial expansionRussell, Elbert W. - Behavior Science Notes, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study re-examines Otterbein's (1970) data on territorial expansion and military sophistication. The author finds that a society's level of "ferocity (or tendency to attack) is more highly correlated with territorial expansion than military sophistication.

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  2. Warfare regulation: a cross-cultural test of hypotheses among tribal peoplesTefft, Stanton K. - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 8 Hypotheses

    This paper tests "theories which suggest that there are causal-functional relationships between the dependent variables peacemaking and peace stability on the one hand and certain independent variables, such as political complexity, warrior class, warfare objectives, cultural homology and intersocietal ties, on the other hand." Significant relationships were found between the last three independent variables.

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  3. Military organization as a response to residence and size of population: a cross-cultural studyCarter, Jr., Harold - Behavior Science Research, 1977 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study tests an adaptational theory of military organization. Test of the relationship between population, residence type and military organization are presented; findings support the hypotheses.

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  4. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  5. Social structure and conflict: Evidence from sub-Saharan AfricaMoscona, Jacob - Working paper, 2017 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using a sample of 145 African societies, the authors seek to examine the relationship between segmentary lineage organization and conflict. Presented is evidence supporting the claim that segmentary lineage societies are more prone to conflict and to conflicts larger in scale and duration. The authors aim to contribute to a better understanding of the determinants of conflict, and additionally address the applicability of the present study beyond Africa.

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  6. The relationship between male dominance and militarism: quantitative tests of several theoriesHoy, Andrew R. - World Cultures, 1994 - 5 Hypotheses

    Theories about the relationship between warfare, militarism, male dominance and authoritarianism are tested.

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  7. A cross-cultural method for predicting nonmaterial traits in archeologyMcNett, Charles W., Jr. - Behavior Science Notes, 1970 - 2 Hypotheses

    "This paper presents an exploratory attempt to solve the problem of how to infer traits for which no direct material evidence remains." The author suggests that the archeologically defined community pattern can predict several sociocultural traits. Results support this hypothesis.

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  8. An equilibrium conflict model of land tenure in hunter-gatherer societiesBaker, Matthew - The Journal of Political Economy, 2003 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines land ownership and territoriality among hunter-gatherers in relation to resource density and predictability and defense technology. A model is presented and briefly tested on a cross-cultural sample of 14 hunter-gatherer societies. Results suggest that societies in more resource-rich areas will be more territorial than societies in less resource-rich areas.

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  9. Naming and identity: a cross-cultural study of personal naming practicesAlford, Richard - , 1987 - 14 Hypotheses

    This book examines naming practices cross-culturally. The author posits that naming practices help to both reflect and create conceptions of personal identity. Several correlations between name meanings and practices and various sociocultural variables are presented.

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  10. Explaining divergence in the long-term effects of precolonial centralization on access to public infrastructure services in NigeriaArchibong, Belinda - World Development, 2019 - 8 Hypotheses

    This study investigates previous findings that indicate precolonial centralization was beneficial for development in Africa. Using new survey data from public primary schools, the author shows that the failure of leaders of centralized regions to comply with federal regimes was punished with underinvestment in public infrastructure services, hindering development and limiting access to these services in recent populations. The author proposes that the extent to which precolonial centralization was beneficial for development in Africa is mediated by compliance of the local governing bodies with federal regimes.

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