Found 706 Documents across 71 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. A model of the sexual division of laborBurton, Michael L. - American Ethnologist, 1977 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study presents a model of sexual division of labor using entailment analysis that accounts for distance of the task away from home and danger of the task. Results support the notion that childbirth and nursing are the main constraints on the sexual division of labor and that men tend to be allocated tasks that are more distant and dangerous.

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  2. A cross-cultural analysis of the behavior of women and men: implications for the origins of sex differencesWood, Wendy - Psychological Bulletin, 2002 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the usefulness of three theoretical orientations in explaining sex differences cross-culturally: social constructionism, evolutionary psychology, and the authors’ biosocial theory. The biosocial model is tested in a thorough literature review, and the authors ultimately suggest that the patriarchy and division of labor by gender are due primarily to female reproductive activity and secondarily to male size and strength.

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  3. Women's Power, Children's LaborBradley, Candice - Cross-Cultural Research, 1993 - 15 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the sexual division of labor between adults and children. Data analysis suggests that children usually perform tasks appropriate for an adult of the same gender, but boys will often perform women’s tasks while girls generally do not perform men’s tasks. Thus, women tend to benefit more from children’s labor.

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  4. Factors in the division of labor by sex: a cross-cultural analysisMurdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1973 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article investigates factors influencing the division of labor by gender, including occupation specialization, the type of material labor involves, the presence of the plow, nomadism, and the advantage that a product may yield to either sex. Hypotheses are widely supported.

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  5. A re-examination of the cross-cultural principles of task segregation and sex role differentiation in the familyCrano, Joel - American Sociological Review, 1975 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines Parsons' and Bales' proposition that a universal feature of social structure is gender sex role specialization of tasks. Results suggest that women contribute substantially to the subsistence economy across many domains, casting doubt on such universality.

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  6. Twin infanticide: a cross-cultural test of a materialistic explanationGranzberg, Gary - Ethos, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study investigates a material explanation for the practice of twin infanticide. Empirical analysis suggests that twin infanticide is more likely where women lack sufficient facilities to rear two infants while fulfilling her other responsibilities.

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  7. The sexual division of labor and the value of childrenBradley, Candice - Behavior Science Research, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the adult sexual division of labor to determine what predicts the value of children cross-culturally.Using log-linear analysis, the author finds that adult sexual division of labor in animal husbandry is associated with the value of children.

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  8. Violence Against Women: A Cross-cultural Analysis for AfricaAlesina, Alberto - Economica, 2021 - 3 Hypotheses

    The authors of this study investigate both intimate partner violence (IPV) in Africa and tolerance towards it. Merging Demographic and Health Survey data with information from the Ethnographic Atlas, they take into account a wide range of ancestral characteristics that could influence domestic violence today, including precolonial economic roles and marriage traditions. Their findings indicate that societies in which men were dominant in subsistence and/or had androcentric marital practices have more IPV today, and more acceptance of it. They also find an interesting gender gap in acceptance of IPV, in which women are more likely than men to justify domestic violence.

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  9. Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african societiesRomanoff, Steven - Behavior Science Research, 1992 - 12 Hypotheses

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  10. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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