Found 748 Documents across 75 Pages (0.04 seconds)
  1. 'Bureaucracy' and 'rationality' in Weber's organization theoryUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - American Sociological Review, 1959 - 3 Hypotheses

    "Seven of Max Weber's ideal-typical specifications for 'rational bureaucracy' are reformulated as a system of three 'bureaucratic' and four 'rational' variables. It is proposed that (a) bureaucratic variables are positively associated; (b) rational variables are positively associated; but that (c) rational variables are negatively associated with bureaucratic variables." Hypotheses are supported.

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  2. Work in traditional and modern societyUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - , 1970 - 17 Hypotheses

    Udy divides methods of work organization into 'production determined', 'technologically determined', 'socially determined', and 'pluralistic' types, and examines their prevalence across societies with varying subsistence activities and levels of social and political stratification. Special attention is paid to processes of integration and differentiation and their role in effecting transitions between organization types.

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  3. Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustrial peoplesUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - , 1959 - 36 Hypotheses

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  4. Administrative rationality, social setting, and organizational developmentUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - American Journal of Sociology, 1962 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines organizational characteristics associated with administrative rationality, as well as how organizational development differs under varying social or cultural conditions.

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  5. Population growth, society, and culture: an inventory of cross-culturally tested causal hypothesesSipes, Richard G. - , 1980 - 51 Hypotheses

    This book examines population growth rate and its correlates by testing 274 hypotheses (derived from multiple theories) with an 18-society sample. Forty-one of these hypotheses were significant at the .05 level, leading the author to accept these relationships as reflective of the real world. The 274 hypotheses are grouped into 51 broader hypotheses, and marked by (*) where relationships are significant as designated by the author or by significance p < 0.05.

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  6. PossessionBourguignon, Erika - , 1976 - 5 Hypotheses

    This book investigates possession and possession-trance. While the author focuses on a case study of Haiti, there are also a handful of cross cultural tests performed. Results suggest that societal complexity is associated with belief in possession-trance, rather than possession alone.

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  7. A comparative study of human sacrificeSheils, Howard Dean - Cross-Cultural Research, 1980 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study takes an economic approach in examining the practice of human sacrifice as it relates to notions of the economic value of human life. Codes are included.

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  8. Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial SocietiesFrederic L. Pryor - , 2005 - 26 Hypotheses

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  9. Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african societiesRomanoff, Steven - Behavior Science Research, 1992 - 12 Hypotheses

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  10. Archaeology of slavery from cross-cultural perspectiveHrnčíř, Václav - Cross-Cultural Research, 2017 - 8 Hypotheses

    The authors examine correlations between slavery and variables that can potentially be detected archaeologically. The authors do not test specific hypotheses, but aim to explore the variables in a broader sense. As such, the authors use a grounded theory approach to data analysis in order to examine trends that emerge from the data itself.

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