Found 1210 Documents across 121 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. The fear of death in primitive societiesLester, David - Science Research, 1975 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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  2. The fear of the dead in nonliterate societiesLester, David - Journal of Social Psychology, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors hypothesizes that fear of the dead will be correlated with an emphasis on achievement and affiliation in folk tales. Results do not support this hypothesis.

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  3. Suicide, homicide, and the effects of socializationLester, David - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1967 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study tests for an association between displays of aggression and socialization techniques in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests there is no relationship between discipline techniques and homicidal or suicidal behavior.

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  4. Suicide and mutilation behaviors in non-literate societiesLester, David - Psychological Reports, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper tests for a relationship between practices of mutilation and self-torture and the incidence of suicidal behavior in preindustrial, nonliterate societies. Several hypotheses are tested but none supported.

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  5. National motives and psychogenic death ratesLester, David - Science, 1968 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  6. The relation between discipline experiences and the expression of aggressionLester, David - American Anthropologist, 1967 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates the relationship between discipline experiences in preindustrial societies and aggressive behavior at the societal level. No associations are found between discipline experiences and suicide, murder, aggression resulting from alcohol consumption, or aggression expressed in war-making.

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  7. Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspectiveAberle, David F. - Matrilineal Kinship, 1961 - 15 Hypotheses

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  8. The relationship between mother/infant contact and later differentiation of the social environmentZern, David - Journal of Genetic Psychology, 1972 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between mother absence in child rearing and kinship terminology, particularly the differentiation of daughters and nieces. A significant association is found and the author offers theories of causality in both directions.

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  9. Social integration and suicide: a test of durkheim's theoryMasumura, Wilfred T. - Behavior Science Research, 1977 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study reexamines Durkheim’s theory of social integration and suicide and tests for an association in a cross-cultural sample of pre-literate societies. Contrary to Durkheim’s theory, the author finds that suicide varies inversely with both social and religious integration. Results also suggested that suicide is negatively associated with a society’s ritual activity. Overall it is suggested that alienated persons in highly integrated societies will be at a greater risk of suicide than those in less integrated societies.

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  10. The use of discipline in socialization: its relationship to cognitive complexityZern, David - Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between disciplining children and cognitive complexity. 1027 relationships between individual variable pairs are tested, and a significant portion support an association between pressure for obedience to social norms and complexity. Additional socialization variables are considered; gender and age differences are also discussed.

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