Found 1041 Documents across 105 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Male Initiation RitesTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural male initiation rites findings pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  2. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  3. Male transvestism and the couvade: a psycho-cultural analysisMunroe, Robert L. - Ethos, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines institutionalized male transvestism and the couvade, finding that they are mutually exclusive in a cross-cultural sample. Possible explanations for the negative association between male transvestism and the couvade (e.g. sex-identity differentiation and confusion) are discussed.

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  4. Institutionalized male transvestism and sex distinctionsMunroe, Robert L. - American Anthropologist, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study attempts to replicate earlier findings regarding transvestism using a larger sample and a different index of sex distinctions. It is asserted that societies that maximize sex distinctions will not have institutionalized male transvestism.

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  5. Factors in the cross-cultural patterning of male homosexuality: a reappraisal of the literatureCrapo, Richard H. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1995 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study argues that different types of homosexuality must be examined separately. Authors focus on mentorship and pathic homosexual behavior and test factors that are associated with these two types of behavior.

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  6. Institutionalized male transvestism, the couvade, and homosexual behaviorGray, J. Patrick - Ethos, 1984 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study employs a psychological theory and builds on the holocultural literature on male homosexuality. Two hypotheses relating homosexual behavior among men to social constructs for sexuality (the couvade, male transvestism) are derived from a study by Munroe (1980). The hypotheses are tested and supported in a sample of cultures drawn from Munroe's codes and the Human Relations Area Files.

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  7. Is homosexuality more prevalent in agropastoral than in hunting and gathering societies?: Evidence from the Standard Cross-Cultural SampleApostolou, Menelaos - Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology, 2016 - 3 Hypotheses

    The researcher predicts a positive association between prevalence of homosexuality and agricultural and pastoral subsistence types, reasoning that higher frequency of arranged marriages among agropastoral societies will lessen negative selection pressure on genes which encode for non-exclusive heterosexual orientation. Findings appear to support the prediction.

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  8. A re-examination of the cross-cultural principles of task segregation and sex role differentiation in the familyCrano, Joel - American Sociological Review, 1975 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines Parsons' and Bales' proposition that a universal feature of social structure is gender sex role specialization of tasks. Results suggest that women contribute substantially to the subsistence economy across many domains, casting doubt on such universality.

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  9. A new cross-cultural study of drunkennessField, Peter B. - Society, Culture and Drinking Patterns, 1962 - 11 Hypotheses

    This book chapter builds on Horton's 1943 psychoanalytical study of drunkenness. The author tests an overall theory that drunkenness, which facilitates personal and uninhibited interactions, is more acceptable, and therefore prevalent, in societies with loose, rather than rigid, social relationships. Indicators of social rigidity, such as strict socialization or male dominance through patrilocality, are tested for relationships to drunkenness.

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  10. Sexual division of labor in agricultureBurton, Michael L. - American Anthropologist, 1984 - 7 Hypotheses

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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