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  1. The causes of matrilocal residence: a cross-ethnohistorical surveyDivale, William Tulio - , 1974 - 20 Hypotheses

    Author proposes and presents evidence in support of the theory that most societies practice virilocal or patrilocal residence (this is the "normal" pattern" and that matrilocal residence is adopted when societies migrate to an already populated area.

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  2. An explanation for matrilocal residenceDivale, William Tulio - Being Female: Reproduction, Power, and Change, 1975 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study explores possible causes of matrilocal residence. Previous hypotheses are unsupported. Results show a significant relationship between matrilocality and recent migration.

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  3. Migration, external warfare, and matrilocal residenceDivale, William Tulio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1974 - 3 Hypotheses

    Several theories on the development of matrilocal residence are tested. The main argument put forth predicts that matrilocal residence will develop in response to a need to break up fraternal interest groups that encourage internal war and instead encourage a pattern of external war that is more beneficial in populated regions with additional group migration.

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  4. War, peace, and marital residence in pre-industrial societiesDivale, William Tulio - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1976 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article tests a series of hypotheses differentiating internal warfare and external warfare. Results support the theory that internal warfare is a population control mechanism more common in patrilocal societies, whereas external warfare occurs between two societies, one of which recently migrated and adopted matrilocal residence. Based on these findings, the authors assert that internal warfare can be regulated while external warfare cannot.

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  5. An archaeological indicator of matrilocal versus patrilocal residenceEmber, Melvin - American Antiquity, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    The study suggests an archaeological indicator of matrilocal versus patrilocal residence. The cross-cultural samples suggest that matrilocal versus patrilocal residence can be simply and accurately predicted from the living floor area of the average house in the society.

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  6. House floor area as a correlate of marital residence pattern: a logistic regression approachPorcic, Marko - Cross-Cultural Research, 2010 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article employs logistic regression to test the relationship between house floor area and marital residence. Results indicate there is an association, but the relationship is stronger in a solely agricultural sample and nonexistent in a non-agricultural sample. This is likely due to the tendency for mobile groups to build several smaller homes for faster and more efficient household construction. Overall the authors suggest that floor area alone should not be taken as a sole indicator of marital residence.

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  7. Population, warfare, and the male supremacist complexDivale, William Tulio - American Anthropologist, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the factors associated with the development and persistence of an ideology of male supremacy. Authors identify several realms of culture that show a clear male preference and suggest that warfare is the most significant cause of the male supremacy complex in preindustrial societies. Authors hypothesize that warfare will be positively related to female infanticide. Results support this hypothesis. Another hypothesis relating diet to warfare and infanticide is provided, but not tested.

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  8. Population estimation from floor area: a restudy of "naroll's constant"Brown, Barton McCaul - Cross-Cultural Research, 1987 - 4 Hypotheses

    A restudy of Naroll's (1962) measure of dwelling floor area using theory that it is predicted by the basic needs for protection from climate and crowding. This theory is not supported by the findings but Brown posits a new average for estimating floor area in dwellings based on his sample.

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  9. Floor area and settlement populationNaroll, Raoul - American Antiquity, 1962 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper discusses the relationship between floor area and settlement population.

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  10. Climatic instability, food storage, and the development of numerical counting: a cross-cultural studyDivale, William Tulio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 4 Hypotheses

    A model for the development of counting systems is tested. The hypothesis presented predicts that unpredictable climate conditions result in inconsistent food supply which leads to the need for food storage and, thus, a system to account for the stored food. Results strongly support this hypothesis.

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