Found 657 Documents across 66 Pages (0.041 seconds)
  1. 'Bureaucracy' and 'rationality' in Weber's organization theoryUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - American Sociological Review, 1959 - 3 Hypotheses

    "Seven of Max Weber's ideal-typical specifications for 'rational bureaucracy' are reformulated as a system of three 'bureaucratic' and four 'rational' variables. It is proposed that (a) bureaucratic variables are positively associated; (b) rational variables are positively associated; but that (c) rational variables are negatively associated with bureaucratic variables." Hypotheses are supported.

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  2. Work in traditional and modern societyUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - , 1970 - 17 Hypotheses

    Udy divides methods of work organization into 'production determined', 'technologically determined', 'socially determined', and 'pluralistic' types, and examines their prevalence across societies with varying subsistence activities and levels of social and political stratification. Special attention is paid to processes of integration and differentiation and their role in effecting transitions between organization types.

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  3. Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustrial peoplesUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - , 1959 - 36 Hypotheses

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  4. The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive and peasant economiesPryor, Frederic L. - , 1977 - 39 Hypotheses

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  5. The evolution of productive organizationsBrahm, Francisco - Nature Human Behaviour, 2021 - 1 Hypotheses

    Drawing from cultural evolution theory, the authors develop a model to explain the origin and evolution of productive organizations (organizations specialized in producing goods and services to satisfy human needs). They propose that productive organizations have two characteristics: exclusive membership and enhanced social learning within the organization. They find their predictions supported in a global sample of premodern societies.

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  6. Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspectiveAberle, David F. - Matrilineal Kinship, 1961 - 15 Hypotheses

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  7. A comparative study of human sacrificeSheils, Howard Dean - Cross-Cultural Research, 1980 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study takes an economic approach in examining the practice of human sacrifice as it relates to notions of the economic value of human life. Codes are included.

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  8. Precolonial institutions and deforestation in AfricaLarcom, Shaun - Land Use Policy, 2016 - 3 Hypotheses

    Controlling on a wide range of factors, this article examines the relationship between precolonial systems of leadership succession and contemporary deforestation rates. In a study of areas within the boundaries of 649 precolonial societies, the article finds that areas where local leaders were appointed by social standing were more likely to have poorer institutions governing forest management. The authors emphasize the importance of local governance over forest management and argue that precolonial institutions of leadership still have a bearing on current systems of forest management.

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  9. Social solidarityLomax, Alan - Folk Song Style and Culture, 1968 - 9 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the relationship between social cohesion (measured using variables like subsistence type, stable work teams, and settlement patterns) and musical cohesion. All hypotheses are supported.

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  10. Women's occupational opportunities: a cross-cultural testNaroll, Maud - Behavior Science Research, 1989 - 2 Hypotheses

    A brief review of research on women's status is presented. Predictions are tested about women's choice of occupation in relation to levels of social complexity.

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