Found 934 Documents across 94 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Child training and game involvementRoberts, John M. - Ethnology, 1962 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study builds on a previous study of games by Roberts, Arth and Bush (1959) and offers a conflict interpretation of game involvement. Several significant relationships are observed between game type and child training variables.

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  2. Games in cultureRoberts, John M. - American Anthropologist, 1959 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationships between game types (physical, strategy, and chance) and social, religious, and geographic variables. Hypotheses are supported.

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  3. The scaling of gaming: skill, strategy, and chanceBall, Donald W. - The Pacific Sociological Review, 1972 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study analyzes the relationship between game complexity and sociocultural complexity. Significant relationships were found between several aspects of complexity and game complexity.

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  4. Cross-cultural correlates of games of chanceRoberts, John M. - Behavior Science Notes, 1966 - 2 Hypotheses

    Authors investigate the cross-cultural correlates of games of chance. They advance a "conflict-enculturation" model to explain why individuals choose to engage in games of chance in particular (as opposed to games of strategy or physical skill). They suggest that games of chance are linked to cultures with antecedent conflict and/or feelings of powerlessness in the presence of uncertainty; both are psychological stressors whose effects may be assuaged by play with uncertainty models in the form of games of chance.

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  5. Games in culture revisited: a replication and extension of roberts, arth, and bush (1959)Chick, Garry - Cross-Cultural Research, 1998 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study replicates the study of games conducted by Roberts, Arth and Bush (1959) using new data. Findings support the results of the original study, suggesting that games of strategy are related to social complexity and games of chance are related to games of physical skill.

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  6. A cross-cultural study of aggression and crimeAllen, Martin G. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1972 - 18 Hypotheses

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

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  7. Aloofness and intimacy of husbands and wives: a cross-cultural studyWhiting, John W.M. - Ethos, 1975 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines husband-wife relationships, specifically rooming and sleeping arrangements, as they relate to variables such as infant care, subsistence, residence, and cultural complexity. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  8. Norms of premarital sexual behavior: a cross-cultural studyBroude, Gwen J. - Ethos, 1975 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article examines correlates of premarital sexual norms cross-culturally. Several explainations of restrictiveness of premarital sex are reviewed, and results indicate that accessibility of caretakers in childhood, class stratification and cultural complexity are all related to premarital sexual norms.

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  9. Ethnoscientific expertise and knowledge specialisation in 55 traditional culturesLightner, Aaron D. - Evolutionary Human Sciences, 2021 - 5 Hypotheses

    The authors of this exploratory study tested predictions from five different theoretical models for the evolution of ethnoscientific expertise. They claim support for three of the models. They then compared cultural variables and their five models to three different knowledge domains: conceptual (unable to be easily observed), motor (easily observable), and medicinal. Their results indicate that their cultural transmission model is associated with the motor knowledge domain and that their proprietary knowledge model is associated with the medicinal knowledge domain.

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  10. Primitive militarismEckhardt, William - Journal of Peace Research, 1975 - 6 Hypotheses

    The reasons "primitive" peoples engaged in warfare are discussed. In order to resolve any inconsistencies in previous studies of warfare, this article looks closely at Textor's (1967) warfare variables and their correlations with other variables included in Textor's (1967) anthropological summary.

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