Found 691 Documents across 70 Pages (0.029 seconds)
  1. Using drug foods to capture and enhance labor performance: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Current Anthropology, 1996 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between drug foods and colonialism in relation to labor and trade. Relationships were found between political complexity, subsistence type, and the use of drug foods as labor and trade enhancers and inducers.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differencesChild, Irvin L. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1965 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Sociocultural aspects of alcohol addictionBarry III, Herbert - The Addictive States, 1968 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines cultural variation in alcoholism with a particular focus on the role of imperialist contact. Cultural prohibition of alcohol and child-rearing variables are also considered. Several hypotheses are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. A cross-cultural study of drinking: i. descriptive measurements of drinking customsChild, Irvin L. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Suppl., 1965 - 4 Hypotheses

    Factor analysis is employed to examine variables related to alcohol consumption. Hypotheses related to the integration of drinking, inebriety, aggression while intoxicated, and quantity of drinking are examined.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. A new cross-cultural study of drunkennessField, Peter B. - Society, Culture and Drinking Patterns, 1962 - 11 Hypotheses

    This book chapter builds on Horton's 1943 psychoanalytical study of drunkenness. The author tests an overall theory that drunkenness, which facilitates personal and uninhibited interactions, is more acceptable, and therefore prevalent, in societies with loose, rather than rigid, social relationships. Indicators of social rigidity, such as strict socialization or male dominance through patrilocality, are tested for relationships to drunkenness.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of cultureBacon, Margaret K. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Suppl., 1965 - 12 Hypotheses

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinkingMcClelland, David C. - The Drinking Man, 1972 - 8 Hypotheses

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. The relationship between use of alcohol and thematic content of folktales in primitive societiesKalin, Rudolph - The General Inquirer, 1966 - 5 Hypotheses

    The authors of the present study investigate the psychological correlates of heavy drinking by using thematic content of folktales as a reflection of the cognitive processes of people in a given society. Subsequently, thematic variables are compared to ethnographic ratings in order to better understand how and if thought and reality correlate. Results are examined in the context of previous findings by other researchers, namely D. Horton (1943).

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Power and inhibition: a revision of the magical potency theoryWanner, Eric - The drinking man, 1972 - 3 Hypotheses

    This book chapter (4) follows up suggestions from a previous chapter (3) by McClelland et.al. that in non-solidary societies heavy drinking is associated with conflict about personal power and alcohol provides a way of acting out impulses aimed at impacting others. Support was found for this theory using an analysis of words in folktales.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Explaining alcoholism: an empirical test and reformationWhitehead, Paul C. - Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1974 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines a hypothesis that associates alcoholism with the structure and quality of social norms related to drinking. Analysis yields little support for this hypothesis, but the amount of alcohol consumed by members of the society emerges as an important predictive variable. A new theory of alcoholism that takes this variable into account is discussed.

    Related DocumentsCite