Found 796 Documents across 80 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a new analysisRoss, Marc Howard - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1985 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

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  2. Female political participation: a cross-cultural explanationRoss, Marc Howard - American Anthropologist, 1986 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper explores societal-level mechanisms associated with women’s participation in and exclusion from political life. Analysis suggests there are two statistically independent types of female political participation: involvement in decision-making and the existence of positions controlled by or reserved for women. Multiple regression analysis identifies several social-structural, psychocultural, and behavioral correlates for both types of female political participation and explanatory theory is discussed.

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  3. Political organization and political participation: exit, voice, and loyalty in preindustrial societiesRoss, Marc Howard - Comparative Politics, 1988 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines causes of political participation in pre-industrial societies, particularly the level of resources and organization of resources. Hirschman’s concepts of exit, voice, and loyalty are also discussed. A distinction is made between range of community decision-making and the degree of adult involvement. Results from a multiple regression analysis favor the more structural variables (i.e. organization of resources) in the prediction of political participation.

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  4. A cross-cultural theory of political conflict and violenceRoss, Marc Howard - Political Psychology, 1986 - 0 Hypotheses

    This study tests various theories on conflict. Multiple regression analyses are presented and support is given for the psychocultural perspective.

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  5. Belief in the evil eye in world perspectiveRoberts, John M. - The Evil Eye, 1976 - 18 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the variables that are associated with the evil eye belief cross-culturally. Results suggest that the evil eye belief is significantly associated with various socioeconomic and demographic variables. All hypotheses are supported.

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  6. A cross-cultural study of aggression and crimeAllen, Martin G. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1972 - 18 Hypotheses

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

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  7. A cross-cultural study of correlates of crimeBacon, Margaret K. - Journal of Abnormal and social Psychology, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    Causal factors to the development of crime are examined. Frequency of theft and personal crime are tested against these causal factors in a search for correlations.

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  8. Oaths, autonomic ordeals, and powerRoberts, John M. - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the presence of oaths and autonomic ordeals in relation to various socioeconomic variables. Several hypotheses are presented, all are supported.

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  9. Relation of child training to subsistence economyBarry III, Herbert - American Anthropologist, 1959 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article discusses the relationship between child training and certain variables, such as economy.

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  10. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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