Found 659 Documents across 66 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Folk song style and cultureLomax, Alan - , 1968 - 9 Hypotheses

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Social solidarityLomax, Alan - Folk Song Style and Culture, 1968 - 9 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the relationship between social cohesion (measured using variables like subsistence type, stable work teams, and settlement patterns) and musical cohesion. All hypotheses are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Song as a measure of cultureLomax, Alan - Folk Song Style and Culture, 1968 - 11 Hypotheses

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Tradition and evolution in song style: a reanalysis of cantometric dataErickson, Edwin E. - Behavior Science Research, 1976 - 3 Hypotheses

    The author reanalyzes hypotheses proposed by Lomax et al. (1968) that are based on Lomax's collection of cantometric data. Considering historical/regional variables, the author suggests that difusion and common history better explain certain musical features such as wordiness than functional and evolutionary processes. However, other Lomax findings are supported involving interlocked, contrapuntal singing and narrow nasal-voiced singing.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Dance style and cultureLomax, Alan - Folk Song Style and Culture, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    This chapter suggests that dance styles reflect cultural traits. The authors hypothesize that certain aspects of cultural complexity predict several types of dance movement. Hypotheses are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Correlations in the population structure of music, genes and languageBrown, Steven - Proc. R. Soc. B, 2014 - 6 Hypotheses

    By testing relationships between musical, geographic, genetic, and linguistic distance among nine indigenous groups in Taiwan, the researchers aim to quantitatively evaluate a developing theory of coevolution between these traits. An especially strong correlation between musical variability and genetic distance suggests that music may possess worldwide time depth, diversity, and universality equal to or greater than that of language, and could thus serve as a complementary marker for reconstruction of long-term population shifts.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Universals and cultural variation in turn-taking in conversationStivers, Tanya - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2009 - 3 Hypotheses

    In order to investigate cross-cultural variation in systems of conversational turn-taking (who speaks and when), the researchers analyze the association of various contextual, verbal, and non-verbal factors with mean response time. Despite some variation in response time between languages, each of the explanatory variables is found to have significant impact on response time independent of language. A further test on subjective perception of ideal response time suggests that although similar factors act on response patterns cross-culturally (in support of a 'universal systems' theory), speakers are hypersensitive to even minor cultural variations in response time.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Factors and patterns: the nature of sociocultural variationErickson, Edwin E. - Behavior Science Research - 0 Hypotheses

    The author claims that variance in sociocultural variables can be mostly be attributed to associations that are not cross-cultural. Although some patterns are universal, many social patterns occur on a regional, rather than worldwide, scale. This study presents a factor analysis of sociocultural variables that supports these claims.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Behavioural variation in 172 small-scale societies indicates that social learning is the main mode of human adaptationMathew, Sarah - Proc. R. Soc. B, 2015 - 8 Hypotheses

    Inter-group variation is greater in humans than in any other animal, and scholars continue to debate the cause of this diversity. Two competing explanatory models of human variation emphasize either (1) ecological differences and "evoked" culture or (2) population-level effects of cultural transmission. The former emphasizes mechanisms that operate within a single generation, while the latter emphasizes cumulative cultural history operating over many generations. To test these competing models, the authors measured the relative power of ecological variables as compared to culture history to predict behavioral variation in 172 western North American tribes. Culture history is subdivided into culture phylogeny (based on language phylogeny) and spatial distance.

    Related DocumentsCite