Found 581 Documents across 59 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  2. Corporal punishment and other formative experiences associated with violent crimesBarry III, Herbert - The Journal pf Psychohistory, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    The focus of this article is the frequency of violent crimes. Five fomative experiences that are correlated with frequent violent crime by individuals are presented. This study uses the same sample as Ember and Ember (1992).

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  3. Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of social controlWhiting, John W.M. - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  4. Correlates and consequences of stress in infancyLandauer, Thomas K. - Handbook of Cross-Cultural Human Development, 1981 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study is a continuation of previous research on the relationship between stress during infancy and adult height. With a better understanding of the stressors that infants experience and their effects, the authors test whether the relationship between stress and adult height remains significant when accounting for other environmental factors that may influence adult height. Results suggest that the relationship between infant stress and adult height does remain significant. Findings also show a relationship between infant stress and age at menarche.

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  5. Menarcheal age and infant stress in humansWhiting, John W.M. - Sex and Behavior, 1965 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between infant stress and early menarche. Empirical analysis suggests that stress in infancy, such as mother-infant separation and head-shaping, are associated with early menarche.

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  6. The relationship of marital intimacy and aloofness to social environment: a hologeistic studyBroude, Gwen J. - Behavior Science Research, 1987 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study explores the correlates of marital intimacy cross-culturally. Previous theories are challenged and a new measure of marital intimacy is presented. Findings suggest that marital intimacy is likely to occur in societies where individuals have no social support outside of marriage.

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  7. Infant socialization and games of chanceBarry III, Herbert - Ethnology, 1972 - 14 Hypotheses

    This paper explores the relationship between games of chance and various aspects of infant socialization, as well as subsistence economy and social organization. Several significant associations were found between these variables.

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  8. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  9. Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatural beings: a cross societal studyLambert, William W. - Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1959 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  10. A cross-cultural analysis of the behavior of women and men: implications for the origins of sex differencesWood, Wendy - Psychological Bulletin, 2002 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the usefulness of three theoretical orientations in explaining sex differences cross-culturally: social constructionism, evolutionary psychology, and the authors’ biosocial theory. The biosocial model is tested in a thorough literature review, and the authors ultimately suggest that the patriarchy and division of labor by gender are due primarily to female reproductive activity and secondarily to male size and strength.

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