Found 710 Documents across 71 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Social contexts of suicideKrauss, Herbert H. - Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the thwarting disorientation theory of suicide, suggesting that the rate of suicide in a society can be predicted from thwarting disorientation traits such as men’s divorce freedom and defiant homicide.

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  2. Population growth, society, and culture: an inventory of cross-culturally tested causal hypothesesSipes, Richard G. - , 1980 - 51 Hypotheses

    This book examines population growth rate and its correlates by testing 274 hypotheses (derived from multiple theories) with an 18-society sample. Forty-one of these hypotheses were significant at the .05 level, leading the author to accept these relationships as reflective of the real world. The 274 hypotheses are grouped into 51 broader hypotheses, and marked by (*) where relationships are significant as designated by the author or by significance p < 0.05.

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  3. A new cross-cultural study of drunkennessField, Peter B. - Society, Culture and Drinking Patterns, 1962 - 11 Hypotheses

    This book chapter builds on Horton's 1943 psychoanalytical study of drunkenness. The author tests an overall theory that drunkenness, which facilitates personal and uninhibited interactions, is more acceptable, and therefore prevalent, in societies with loose, rather than rigid, social relationships. Indicators of social rigidity, such as strict socialization or male dominance through patrilocality, are tested for relationships to drunkenness.

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  4. A cross-cultural study of aggression and crimeAllen, Martin G. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1972 - 18 Hypotheses

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

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  5. Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggression, and witchcraftQuinlan, Robert J. - American Anthropologist, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  6. Same-sex competition and sexual conflict expressed through witchcraft accusationsPeacey, Sarah - Scientific Reports, 2022 - 11 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors analyze relationships between witchcraft accusations and the gender of the accused. They find that men are most often accused of witchcraft in their sample of 54 Bantu or Bantoid societies, and are particularly more likely to be accused of witchcraft by unrelated or blood-related individuals or in disputes over wealth or prestige. On the other hand, women are more likely to be accused of witchcraft in affinal relationships, particularly husbands and co-wives, and in situations related to fertility or relationships. Elderly women were also more likely to be accused of witchcraft than elderly men. The authors also examined outcomes of witchcraft accusations, finding that 81% of cases resulted in a negative outcome for the accused. They suggest that competition underlies accusations of witchcraft.

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  7. Witchcraft and co-wife proximity in southwestern kenyaLeVine, Robert A. - Ethnology, 1962 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationship between polygyny and witchcraft accusations in three societies in Kenya. It is argued that the closer co-wives live (have adjacent houses, common yard), the more likely they are to accuse one another of witchcraft. The affects of household structure on population density and intra-household relationships are also discussed.

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  8. Belief in the evil eye in world perspectiveRoberts, John M. - The Evil Eye, 1976 - 18 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the variables that are associated with the evil eye belief cross-culturally. Results suggest that the evil eye belief is significantly associated with various socioeconomic and demographic variables. All hypotheses are supported.

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  9. Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of social controlWhiting, John W.M. - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  10. A cross-cultural study of drunkennessDavis, William N. - , 1964 - 18 Hypotheses

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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