Found 843 Documents across 85 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Sex differences in aggression: phylogenetic and enculturation perspectivesRohner, Ronald P. - Ethos, 1976 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents evidence suggesting that sex differences in aggression are universal, but that the differences are also highly susceptible to experiential modification. Following a “phylogenetic perspective” that emphasizes the interaction of genotype and experience, the author finds that boys are on average more aggressive than girls but adult males as a group are not significantly more aggressive than women.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. A cross-cultural study of female initiation ritesBrown, Judith K. - American Anthropologist, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article discusses initiation rites for girls. Specifically explored are the reasons why the ceremonies are observed in some societies and omitted in others and what the variations between societies demonstrates.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Pubic Hair Removal Practices in Cross-Cultural PerspectiveCraig, Lyndsey K. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    Researcher's examine the presence of pubic hair removal (PHR) and retention in a cross-cultural setting, looking to see if such practices exist outside of the West, where it is well documented. Data from societies with PHR or retention from the eHRAF World Cultures sample were analyzed. Results indicate that PHR or retention exists cross-culturally without influence from the West. Commonly practiced for hygiene, women remove or retain pubic hair more often than men, with the main methods for removal being plucking.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. A cross-cultural study of aggression and crimeAllen, Martin G. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1972 - 18 Hypotheses

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. A cross-cultural analysis of recruitment into all male groups: an ethological perspectiveMackey, Wade C. - Journal of Human Evolution, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines proxemic behavior between adults and children in 10 cultures. Data suggests that the older boy-adult male dyad is the most common combination of adult groups and children. Relevant theory on hunting and male-male bonding is discussed.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspectiveBaunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender Issues, 2001 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Male dominance and female autonomy: domestic authority in matrilineal societiesSchlegel, Alice - , 1972 - 15 Hypotheses

    This book examines male and female power in various kinship configurations. Variables for male dominance and female autonomy are associated with various political and social variables, such as political complexity and co-wife jealousy. Several hypotheses are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. A cross-cultural study of female initiation ritesBrown, Judith K. - American Anthropologist, 1963 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study explores why initiation rites for girls are observed in some societies and absent in others. Further, the author seeks to understand cross-cultural variation in the rites.

    Related DocumentsCite