Found 817 Documents across 82 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Extra-marital affairs: a reconsideration of the meaning and universality of the "double standard"Jankowiak, William - World Cultures, 2002 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines the variation in responses to sexual infidelity and the effect of social complexity and descent on responses to infidelity. Results suggest significant relationships between social complexity, descent, and responses to infidelity

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  2. Individual and societal response to sexual betrayal: a view from around the worldJankowiak, William - Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality, 2007 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study tests several hypotheses that men and women are differentially invested in their partner's sexual fidelity. Using a cross-cultural sample authors analyze women's and men's responses to sexual infidelity.

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  3. Extramarital sex norms in cross-cultural perspectiveBroude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1980 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study examines the double standard regarding extramarital norms for men and women in relation to other sociocultural factors. Results suggest that a double standard is significantly related to post-partum sex taboos, hypermasculinity, and father absence.

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  4. The material culture and social institutions of the simpler peoples: an essay in correlationHobhouse, L. T. - , 1915 - 16 Hypotheses

    An early cross-cultural study that sought to establish correlations between "stages" of economic culture and a variety of different social and political institutions, such as form of government and justice, marriage and kinship, and behaviors during warfare.

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  5. Body pleasure and the origins of violencePrescott, James W. - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1975 - 4 Hypotheses

    The author hypothesizes that physical violence is strongly related to the deprivation of physical pleasure. The author tests this hypothesis by looking at the relationship between physical affection towards infants, as well as attitudes towards premarital sex, and several variables related to violence. Results support the hypothesis.

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  6. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  7. Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous responseScelza, B. A. - Nature Human Behavior, 2019 - 6 Hypotheses

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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  8. Monopolization of information and female status: a cross-cultural testArtemova, Olga - Cross-Cultural Research, 2003 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study tests a hypothesis developed in a previous study (Artemova 2003). The authors analyze the relationship between the monopolization of politically important information and gender inequality. Sixty correlations are tested between measures of female status and an indicator of information monopolization; findings support the hypothesis.

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  9. Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adulteryRosenblatt, Paul C. - Journal of Sex Research, 1972 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  10. A Test of an Evolutionary Hypothesis of Violence against Women: The Case of Sex RatioStone, Emily A. - Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science, 2017 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper presents empirical tests of two theories put forth to explain violence toward women. The first predicts that warfare promotes socialization for aggression and legitimizes violence toward women, while the second predicts that violence works as a way to control potential for female infidelity. An association is found between high male-to-female sex ratio and violence towards women, suggesting support for the second theory over the first, which is consistent with more narrowly-focused studies by Avakame (1999), Bose et al. (2013), and D'Alessio & Stolzenberg (2010).

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