Found 1033 Documents across 104 Pages (0.033 seconds)
  1. Pregnancy magic: a study of food taboos and sex avoidancesAyres, Barbara - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter attempts to explain why the number, importance, and duration of food and sex taboos during pregnancy vary cross-culturally. The author hypothesizes that differences in child socialization will be associated with differences in food taboos, and differences in sexual behavior and sanctions will be associated with sex taboos. Results support the hypotheses.

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  2. Bride theft and raiding for wives in cross-cultural perspectiveAyres, Barbara - Anthropological Quarterly, 1974 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article seeks to examine the distribution and frequency of bride-theft. Tylor's (1889) findings between various forms of marriage by capture and certain other social instituions are confirmed.

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  3. Possible rhinencephalic influences on human maternal behavior: a cross-cultural studyHines, Dwight - , 1974 - 7 Hypotheses

    Authors study the correlation between maternal behavior and reference to odors in folktales. They find several significant relationships between odor references in folk tales, maternal behavior, and various aspects of infant and child socialization.

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  4. Socioecology shapes child and adolescent time allocation in twelve hunter-gatherer and mixed-subsistence forager societiesLew-Levy, Sheina - Nature Scientific Reports, 2022 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper seeks to understand the roles played by children and adolescents in hunter-gatherer societies in relation to their social and ecological context. The authors set out to investigate how environmental factors, ecological risk, and the energetic contributions of adult men and women to food production may have influenced children/adolescent allocation of time to child care, domestic work, food production, and play. In order to carry out this study, the authors logged the behaviors of 690 children and adolescents from twelve hunter-gatherer and mixed-subsistence societies (Agta, Aka, Baka, BaYaka, Dukha, Hadza, Matsi-genka, Maya, Mayangna, Mikea, Pume, and Tsimane), totaling 85,597 unique observations. The study found that harsh environmental factors were not associated with child/adolescent time allocation, but that local ecological risk such as dangerous animals and lack of water availability predicted decreased time allocation to child care and domestic work, and that increased adult female participation in food production was associated with less time invested in child care among boys. It also found that all gendered differences in time allocation among children were stronger when men made greater contributions to food production than women. The authors interpret these results to signify that parents may play a role in preparing their children for environmental and ecological difficulty in order to help them develop skills that will help them become useful community members as adults.

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  5. Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of social controlWhiting, John W.M. - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  6. Marriage systems as reproductive strategies: cross-cultural evidence for sexual selection in manAyres, Barbara - , 1976 - 0 Hypotheses

    The author argues for the use of sexual selection as a theoretical framework to give meaning to the various cross-cultural studies that show significant association between form of marriage (polygyny vs. monogamy) and other cultural, social, and personality variables. The author suggests that "marriage systems reflect individual reproductive strategies."

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  7. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Extramarital SexTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 15 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on extramarital sexual relations pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  8. Child training and personality: a cross-cultural studyWhiting, John W.M. - , 1953 - 18 Hypotheses

    The authors put forward a theoretical model called "personality integration of culture." At the heart of the model is the idea that psychological processes may help explain why certain aspects of culture are related to other aspects. To test this model they focus on theories and therapies regarding illness and they use psychoanalytic ideas on positive and negative fixation to suggest how differences in child-rearing customs may account for different ideas about the causes of illness. The strongest results relate to socialization anxiety in a particular area of socialization (e.g., oral, dependency, and aggression) amd respective causes of illness. Results regarding negative fixation are generally supported, whereas positive fixation is not.

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  9. A Cross-Cultural Summary: PolygynyTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 21 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  10. Why women's status changes in the middle ages: the turns of the social ferris wheelBart, Pauline B. - Sociological Symposium, 1969 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on the cross-cultural data comparing the relationship between changes in status and availability of important roles, with an emphasis on women. Cultural and structural aspects of society are examined to discover their relationship to the position of women after their child-bearing years.

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