Found 939 Documents across 94 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Family Size and Community Organization: A Cross-Cultural ComparisonBondarenko, Dmitri - Cross-Cultural Research, 2000 - 1 Hypotheses

    The study examines the relationship between communal democracy and family size. The results indicate a weak significant negative correlation between communal leadership and family size. Even though the researchers suggest that the known curvilinear relationship between the variables could challenge this finding, further tests indicate that there are grounds for maintaining that family size has some independent influence on the existence of communal democracy.

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  2. Nuclear vs. Extended Family, Monogamy vs. Polygyny: Democracy vs. Non-Democracy? A Historical-Anthropological Look at Some Socio-Political Problems of Second and Third World CountriesBondarenko, Dmitri M. - Community, Identity and the State. Comparing Africa, Eurasia, Latin America and the Middle East., 2004 - 5 Hypotheses

    Controlling for community type, the researchers examine a potential relationship between family size (nuclear vs. extended) and communal leadership (hereditary vs. elected) in an effort to suggest potential predictors of hierarchical structures in societies. They claim support for their hypothesis that societies with nuclear families will be more likely to have democratic communal leadership, across four different community types.

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  3. Polygyny and democracy: a cross-cultural comparisonKorotayev, Andrey V. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2000 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the relationship between domestic organization (i.e. family structure and size) and democracy at both the communal and supracommunal levels. The authors suggest that the prevalence of independent monogamous families in Europe in the Late Middle Ages may have facilitated the political evolution toward democracy.

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  4. Christianity and democracy: a cross-cultural study (afterthoughts)Korotayev, Andrey V. - World Cultures, 2002 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study proposes that polygyny, unilineal descent organization and large extended families could be regarded as universal negative predictors of communal democracy. Crosstabulations show that Christianity is positively associated with communal democracy and negatively associated with polygyny, and thus the authors suggest that Christianity influenced the development of democracy in Europe through its discouraging of polygyny and unilineal descent organization.

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  5. Communities of Soil and Stone- An Archaeological Investigation of Population AggregationAdler, Michael A. - Chapters 4 & 5, 1990 - 6 Hypotheses

    The dissertation in its entirety is an archaeological investigation of population aggregation among the Mesa Verde region Anasazi A.D. 900-1300. Chapters four and five of Adlers larger work focus on cross-cultural perspectives to inform discussion around resource access and community strength. Multiple different hypotheses were tested with different data sets, but the HRAF database and Standard Cross Cultural Sample were used throughout.

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  6. Evolutionary Models of LeadershipGarfield, Zachary H. - Human Nature, 2019 - 4 Hypotheses

    Researchers tested four models of leadership for qualities and correlates that could predict the transmission of leadership cross-culturally. Researchers sampled 60 societies from the Probability Sample Files, coding for 24 variables. Support was found for the prevalence of the collective action model and the prestige model, with a lack of support found for the dominance leadership model.

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  7. The transmission of democracy: from the village to the nation-stateGiuliano, Paola - The American Economic Review, 2013 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper adds to a body of research which analyzes the persistence of institutional features in societies over time by testing for association between local democracy (succession by consensus among preindustrial groups) and various measures of democracy in contemporary societies. The researchers conclude that beliefs and values which perceive democracy as a viable political structure may be an important mediating mechanism in producing and maintaining democratic instututions over time.

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  8. Warfare, atrocities, and political participation: eastern AfricaEmber, Carol R. - Journal of Aggression, Conflict, and Peace Research, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    The present study attempts to replicate the Ember, Ember, and Russett (1992) worldwide finding that fighting rarely occurs between democracies in a sample of eastern African societies. Following the earlier study, the authors considered internal warfare to be an analog of international warfare and measures of political participation analogous to democracy. The researchers also explore if there is an association between political participation and committing atrocities. Contrary to past findings, internal warfare was not predicted by the same set of variables as the 1992 study, but there is an inverse relationship between committing atrocities and political participation. However, when additional variables were added, internal warfare was significantly predicted by less political participation.

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  9. Societal complexity and familial complexity: evidence for the curvilinear hypothesisBlumberg, Rae Lesser - American Journal of Sociology, 1972 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the relationship between societal complexity and familial complexity. Results suggest that the relationship is somewhat curvilinear; that is, in simpler societies more societal complexity is associated with a larger familial system, but the most developed societies have smaller familial systems. The demographic, economic, and politcal correlates of maximum family size are discussed.

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  10. Personality and subsistence: is the child the parent of the person?Cone, Cynthia A. - Ethnology, 1979 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between personality traits and subsistence type in mixed farming and pastoralists societies. Findings suggest that differences in child socialization do not significantly predict personality differences in mixed farming and pastoralist societies as much as one would expect. Adult experiences should be considered as better predictors of personality traits.

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