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  1. Same-sex competition and sexual conflict expressed through witchcraft accusationsPeacey, Sarah - Scientific Reports, 2022 - 11 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors analyze relationships between witchcraft accusations and the gender of the accused. They find that men are most often accused of witchcraft in their sample of 54 Bantu or Bantoid societies, and are particularly more likely to be accused of witchcraft by unrelated or blood-related individuals or in disputes over wealth or prestige. On the other hand, women are more likely to be accused of witchcraft in affinal relationships, particularly husbands and co-wives, and in situations related to fertility or relationships. Elderly women were also more likely to be accused of witchcraft than elderly men. The authors also examined outcomes of witchcraft accusations, finding that 81% of cases resulted in a negative outcome for the accused. They suggest that competition underlies accusations of witchcraft.

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  2. Decrepitude and death-hastening: the nature of old age in third world societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Studies in Third World Societies, 1982 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines the status and treatment of the elderly in non-industrial societies. Associations are found between social complexity, subsistence type, and the status and treatment of the elderly.

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  3. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  4. A holocultural analysis of old ageGlascock, Anthony P. - Comparative Social Research, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study provides a cross-cultural examination of the definitions of old age. Further research on these definitions and their implications is suggested.

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  5. Social asset or social burden: treatment of the aged in non-industrial societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Dimensions: Aging, Culture, and Health, 1981 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article uses cross-cultural methodology to examine the classification and treatment of the aged. Results suggest that the combination of supportive/unsupportive treatment is associated with the intact/decrepit age grouping.

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  6. A cross-cultural investigation of behavioral changes at menopauseGriffen, Joyce - The Social Science Journal, 1977 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article presents an attempt to cross-culturally test of the hypothesis that rituals and/or behavioral changes will be associated with menopause. Due to a lack of sufficient data, statistical analyses were not performed but an examination of the ethnographic literature on the topic is presented.

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  7. The mother-in-law tabooPans, A.E.M.J. - Ethnology, 1998 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines mother-in-law avoidance, theorizing it is "a device for distinguishing the son-in-law/mother-in-law relationship from the husband-wife relationship in societies where these relationships tend to be similar as far as their economic aspect is concerned” (71). The conditions that may give rise to economic interaction between son-in-law and mother-in-law, such as matrilocal residence, are also discussed.

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  8. Initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural study of status dramatizationYoung, Frank W. - , 1965 - 13 Hypotheses

    This book investigates a broad hypothesis linking social solidarity and initiation ceremonies. The author proposes that “the degree of solidarity of a given social system determines the degree to which status transitions within it will be dramatized” (1). A variety of operational hypotheses are supported for both male and female initiation ceremonies.

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  9. Being in charge: older women and their younger female kinBrown, Judith K. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, 1994 - 4 Hypotheses

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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  10. Avoidance, social affiliation, and the incest tabooSweetser, Dorrian Apple - Ethnology, 1966 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines parent-in-law avoidance in non-industrial societies. The author suggests that in-law avoidance is associated with characteristics of kinship structure, such as lineality, residence and family type. A psychological interpretation is also offered. Results support hypotheses relating to kinship structure.

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