Found 663 Documents across 67 Pages (0.037 seconds)
  1. Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggression, and witchcraftQuinlan, Robert J. - American Anthropologist, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  2. A cross-cultural study of expressive and instrumental role complementarity in the familyCrano, Joel - American Sociological Review, 1978 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the claim that male and female investment in the socioemotional and economic aspects of family life are inversely related. Results suggest that this hypothesis is not supported, although a significant inverse relationship between male and female infant care does exist.

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  3. Infant and child death in the human environment of evolutionary adaptationVolk, Anthony A. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2013 - 3 Hypotheses

    High infant and child mortality rates are suggested to be one of the most enduring and important features of ancestral human environments, referred to as the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness (EEA). These rates contrast with the very low rates of infant and child mortality among many industrialized nations since the 19th and 20th centuries. The authors compare data from recent hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, historical records, and non-human primates in attempt to quantitatively describe infant and child mortality rates during the EEA.

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  4. Paternal behavior and group competitionAlcorta, Candace Storey - Behavior Science Research, 1982 - 2 Hypotheses

    The author, Candace Alcorta, theorizes that low population density gives rise to a suite of factors that together are predictive of a society with internally directed population control strategies. In turn, there is an emphasis for a cooperative internal economic system among family, and a higher investment by fathers in their children.

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  5. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  6. Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of social controlWhiting, John W.M. - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  7. Astronomy in the Upper PalaeolithicHayden, Brian - Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 2011 - 4 Hypotheses

    Researchers examine the ethnographic record, sampling 82 hunter gatherer societies from the HRAF World Cultures database, for cross-cultural patterns of archaeological evidence of knowledge of astronomy and constellations. Surveying the data, researchers identified many patterns in the upper paleolithic, noting the importance of further examination of this topic.

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  8. Menstrual taboos and social rigidityYoung, Frank W. - Cross-Cultural Approaches, 1967 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study first reviews two explanations of menstrual taboos: taboos as an aspect of social rigidity and a psychogenic interpretation of menstrual taboos. The authors chiefly advocate a sociogenic explanation of menstrual taboos.

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  9. A cross cultural study of menstrual taboosStephens, William N. - Cross-Cultural Approaches, 1967 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests the relationship between menstrual taboos and castration anxiety. The author posits that the extensiveness of menstrual taboos is determined by the average castration anxiety. Using various measures of castration anxiety, the author finds significant support for this hypothesis.

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  10. A cross-cultural study of some supernatural beliefsSpiro, Melford E. - Cross-Cultural Approaches, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between child training and supernatural beliefs. The authors develop a schema delineating the role of the supernatural in nurturance and punishment; ten hypotheses associating the role of the supernatural with various child training practices are tested. Several are confirmed.

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