Found 781 Documents across 79 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Wealth transfer and restrictions on sexual relations during betrothalRosenblatt, Paul C. - Ethnology, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    Authors use an exhange theory perspective to explain differences in sex restrictions during betrothal. Results indicate a positive association between the amount of wealth transferred and sex restrictions during betrothal.

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  2. Applying Heider's theory of cognitive balance to Claude Levi-StraussCarroll, Michael P. - Sociometry, 1973 - 2 Hypotheses

    Heider's theory of cognitive balance is applied to Levi-Strauss' discussion of the sentiment relations existing among four kin roles.

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  3. Systematic description and analysis of food sharing practices among hunter-gatherer societies of the AmericasCaro, Jorge - Hunter Gatherer Research, 2019 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper seeks to identify how different practices of food sharing are related to one another, and the degree to which societies in North and South America may share practices with one another. The authors attempt this by using ethnographic literature to break sharing activities down into their constituent, multi-stage parts, and then comparing the prevalence of these parts and their relationships to one another. The study finds that the presence or absence of a distributor in a sharing activity, and who that distributor is, has a significant effect on how sharing is carried out. On the other hand, linguistic relationships between groups seem to have little impact on their sharing practices, and geographic proximity between groups only seems to have a significant effect on sharing practices in North America.

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  4. Understanding cultural persistence and changeGuiliano, Paola - Review of Economic Studies, 2020 - 3 Hypotheses

    Derived from the evolutionary anthropology theory, this study examines the difference of importance placed on traditions and customs between cultures. The authors found that descendants from regions with less climatic stability place less emphasis on tradition and customs than those from more stable environments. The authors suggest that with climatic stability, the traditions and customs which have evolved and benefited the previous generations will be passed on to the next, therefore promoting cultural persistence.

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  5. Courtship patterns associated with freedom of choice of spouseRosenblatt, Paul C. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1972 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates several correlates of freedom of choice of spouse, including general male-female contact and antagonism in premarital male-female interaction. Particular attention is paid to dances in the role of making contact with a spouse.

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  6. Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adulteryRosenblatt, Paul C. - Journal of Sex Research, 1972 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  7. Birth order in cross-cultural perspectiveRosenblatt, Paul C. - Developmental Psychology, 1974 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  8. The moralization bias of gods’ minds: a cross-cultural testPurzycki, Benjamin Grant - Religion, Brain, and Behavior, 2022 - 8 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors inspect the relationship between religion, morality, and cooperation by examining the extent to which people associate their deities with moral concern. Using data from 2,228 individuals in 15 different field sites, they find that on average, people tend to ascribe at least some moral concern to their deities, and this effect is stable even after controlling for the influence of explicitly moralistic deities that these societies also worship. The authors also find that ratings of moral concern are not necessarily very high, even for deities that are typically considered to be moralistic, and that there is individual-level variation in the degree of moral concern attributed to deities. In addition, there is an individual-level correlation between how morally interested two selected deities are conceived to be and that being male or more educated decreases the likelihood of associating deities with moral concern. These findings challenge the longstanding belief that belief in moralistic deities is unique to certain societies or religions and instead suggest that the association between deities and moral concern is more widespread and variable, and suggest that the moral character of gods may be tied to cooperation within societies.

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  9. Explaining alcoholism: an empirical test and reformationWhitehead, Paul C. - Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1974 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines a hypothesis that associates alcoholism with the structure and quality of social norms related to drinking. Analysis yields little support for this hypothesis, but the amount of alcohol consumed by members of the society emerges as an important predictive variable. A new theory of alcoholism that takes this variable into account is discussed.

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  10. The avunculate: a cross-cultural critique of Claude Levi-StraussRyder, James W. - Behavior Science Notes, 1970 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors test Levi-Strauss' theory of the avunculate, a special relationship between a mother's brother and his sister's son. They critique the theory on the grounds that many societies have a special relationship that could be called the avunculate but lack the other relationships predicted by Levi-Strauss.

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