Found 932 Documents across 94 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. Living quarter arrangements in polygyny and circumcision and segregation of males at pubertyKitahara, Michio - Ethnology, 1974 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between polygynous living quarter arrangements and the presence or absence of circumcision and segregation of males at puberty. The amount of contact between the father and son is also examined as a factor.

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  2. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Male Initiation RitesTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural male initiation rites findings pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  3. Significance of the father for the son's masculine identityKitahara, Michio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1975 - 9 Hypotheses

    The significance of the son's insufficient contact with his father during infancy in regard to circumcision and segregation is examined. This article suggests that it is not the long postpartum sexual taboo but the separation of each co-wife that is instrumental in bringing about circumcision and segregation. Expands on Kitahara 1974.

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  4. Symbolic or not-so-symbolic wounds: the behavioral ecology of human scarificationLudvico, Lisa Rose - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1995 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests four hypotheses regarding scarification, which is described as 1) a rite of passage, 2) a hardening/trauma procedure, 3) a nonadaptive sexually selected character, or 4) an adaptive pathogen driven sexually selected character. Only the third hypothesis is supported in a worldwide sample, suggesting that scarification is associated with polygyny. The other three are each supported in different regional subsamples—principally the first hypothesis (supported in Africa, the Insular Pacific, and South America).

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  5. Power and sexual fear in primitive societiesEichler, Margrit - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1975 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article examines correlates of sexual fear among men and women. The author concludes that the more authority men have over women, the more women will dread male genitals and vice versa.

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  6. Pain, fear, and circumcision in boys' adolescent initiation ceremoniesSchlegel, Alice - Cross-Cultural Research, 2017 - 6 Hypotheses

    Schlegel and Barry explore the conditions under which adolescent boys' initiation ceremonies involve rituals that frighten or cause pain to the initiates. The authors look for cross-cultural differences and similarities in cultural features associated with harsh rituals, in particular, genital operations.

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  7. Sex differences in the anatomical locations of human body scarification and tattooing as a function of pathogen prevalenceSingh, Devendra - Evolution and Human Behavior, 1997 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between body scarification and pathogen prevalence. Authors hypothesize that risk of serious pathogens will be related to scarification on areas of the body that are associated with physical attractiveness and fertility. Results show that only female stomach scarification is significantly related to pathogen prevalence.

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  8. Polygyny: insufficient father-son contact and son's masculine identityKitahara, Michio - Archives of Sexual Behavior, 1976 - 8 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this article is to examine circumcision and segregation of males at puberty. It is suggested that when the son has insufficient contact with his father due to the separation caused by polygynous relationships, the son may develop a feminine personality. The significance of this is compared with the significance of a close mother-son relationship.

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  9. Scars for war: evaluating alternative signaling explanations for cross-cultural variance in ritual costsSosis, Richard - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2007 - 11 Hypotheses

    This article uses signaling theory and tests for a relationship between costly male rites and frequency of warfare.

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  10. Sexual selection and human ornamentationLow, Bobbi S. - Evolutionary Theory and Human Social Organization, 1979 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the role of male and female ornamentation. Several hypotheses concerning mating systems and ornamentation are empirically tested; several are supported.

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