Found 599 Documents across 60 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Bride theft and raiding for wives in cross-cultural perspectiveAyres, Barbara - Anthropological Quarterly, 1974 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article seeks to examine the distribution and frequency of bride-theft. Tylor's (1889) findings between various forms of marriage by capture and certain other social instituions are confirmed.

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  2. Correlational analysis of murdock's 1957 ethnographic sampleDriver, Harold E. - American Anthropologist, 1967 - 5 Hypotheses

    This paper "reduces Murdock's 210 categories to 30 variables, and intercorrelates and factor analyzes the variables for six world subdivisions as well as for the entire world." This article also discusses factor analysis as a method and examines the correlations more closely between the two regions that differed the most, North America and the Circum-Mediterranean.

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  3. New cross-cultural perspectives on marriage transactionsHuber, Brad R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2011 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article refines previous research on marriage transactions and offers descriptions of new types of marriage transactions. First, the authors examine the frequency and distribution of marriage transactions. Second,the authors use a bio-cultural approach to examine how differences in male and female reproductive strategies and the kin selection theory are associated with marriage transactions.

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  4. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  5. Social structureMurdock, George Peter - , 1949 - 41 Hypotheses

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  6. A Cross-Cultural Summary: FertilityTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 4 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  7. Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedureMinturn, Leigh - Cross-Cultural Research, 1982 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

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  8. A cross-cultural study of drunkennessDavis, William N. - , 1964 - 18 Hypotheses

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  9. A new cross-cultural study of drunkennessField, Peter B. - Society, Culture and Drinking Patterns, 1962 - 11 Hypotheses

    This book chapter builds on Horton's 1943 psychoanalytical study of drunkenness. The author tests an overall theory that drunkenness, which facilitates personal and uninhibited interactions, is more acceptable, and therefore prevalent, in societies with loose, rather than rigid, social relationships. Indicators of social rigidity, such as strict socialization or male dominance through patrilocality, are tested for relationships to drunkenness.

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  10. Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples of Murdock's DataRudmin, Floyd Webster - Journal of Socio-Economics, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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