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  1. Living with kin in lowland horticultural societiesWalker, Robert S. - Current Anthropology, 2013 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines marital residence and sibling coresidence among horticulturalists in the South American lowlands. The authors reject a hypothesis that patrilocality is the defining trait of Amazonian tropical forest culture. Results on horticulturalists are compared with findings on hunter-gatherers: horticulturalists tend to be more uxorilocal. Empirical analysis also suggests that women tend to live with more kin later in life, and in large villages headmen live with more kin than nonheadmen.

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  2. Myths about hunter-gatherersEmber, Carol R. - Ethnology, 1978 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article challenges common assumptions about hunter-gatherers and demonstrates that previous ideas about residence, division of labor and warfare are not supported by the cross-cultural data.

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  3. Marital residence among foragersMarlowe, Frank W. - Current Anthropology, 2004 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article challenges an earlier finding that hunter-gatherers are predominantly virilocal in residence. The author presents new tests of marital residence including early patterns in marital residence; results suggest that foragers are more multilocal than nonforagers. The author theorizes that bride service, food acquisition methods, small population size, little accumulated wealth, and low frequency of warfare among foragers could all influence the tendency toward multilocal residence.

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  4. An evaluation of alternative theories of matrilocal versus patrilocal residenceEmber, Carol R. - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates the relationship between marital residence and warfare. The author evaluates two theories proposing opposite causalities: one, that internal warfarecauses patrilocality; the other, that residence comes first and influences type of warfare. The author presents a new model emphasizing the role of population size in determining type of warfare, which in turn affects marital residence. However, the role of migration in determining marital residence is also considered.

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  5. The conditions favoring matrilocal versus patrilocal residenceEmber, Melvin - American Anthropologist, 1971 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study analyzes several variables that influence matrilocal versus patrilocal residence. Results indicate that the traditional assumption that division of labor determines residence was not supported. Rather, results suggest that internal warfare favors partilocal residence and matrilocal residence is favored by purely external warfare if division of labor is matridominant.

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  6. Female of the speciesMartin, M. Kay - , 1975 - 12 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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  7. Paternal investment and the human mating systemMarlowe, Frank W. - Behavioural Processes, 2000 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article explores the interrelated roles of male parental investment (males' infant/child care and resource provisioning) and male-male competition (variation in male status) on the degree of monogamy or polygyny in a society. Marlowe argues that Degree of parental investment affects females' interest in resource-shopping versus gene-shopping. Also discussed is the idea that male-male competition affects males' inclination toward harem-defense or coercive polygyny. Particular attention is paid to variation in parental investment and male stratification across subsistence types.

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  8. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-GatherersTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 9 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  9. The causes of matrilocal residence: a cross-ethnohistorical surveyDivale, William Tulio - , 1974 - 20 Hypotheses

    Author proposes and presents evidence in support of the theory that most societies practice virilocal or patrilocal residence (this is the "normal" pattern" and that matrilocal residence is adopted when societies migrate to an already populated area.

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  10. Co-residence patterns in hunter-gatherer societies show unique human social structureHill, Kim - Science, 2011 - 1 Hypotheses

    The biological success derived from cumulative culture and cooperation and their association with ancestral group structure is examined. It is suggested that inclusive fitness cannot explain extensive cooperation in hunter-gatherers because in most of the foraging societies examined, most individuals in residential groups are unrelated. These large social networks may explain why humans are capable of social learning.

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