Found 877 Documents across 88 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. The incidence of suicide and the fear of the dead in non-literate societiesLester, David - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study tests for an association between suicide rates and cultural fear of the dead. Tests do not support a significant relationship.

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  2. Suicide, homicide, and the effects of socializationLester, David - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1967 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study tests for an association between displays of aggression and socialization techniques in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests there is no relationship between discipline techniques and homicidal or suicidal behavior.

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  3. National motives and psychogenic death ratesLester, David - Science, 1968 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  4. The relation between discipline experiences and the expression of aggressionLester, David - American Anthropologist, 1967 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates the relationship between discipline experiences in preindustrial societies and aggressive behavior at the societal level. No associations are found between discipline experiences and suicide, murder, aggression resulting from alcohol consumption, or aggression expressed in war-making.

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  5. Suicide and mutilation behaviors in non-literate societiesLester, David - Psychological Reports, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper tests for a relationship between practices of mutilation and self-torture and the incidence of suicidal behavior in preindustrial, nonliterate societies. Several hypotheses are tested but none supported.

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  6. The fear of the dead in nonliterate societiesLester, David - Journal of Social Psychology, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors hypothesizes that fear of the dead will be correlated with an emphasis on achievement and affiliation in folk tales. Results do not support this hypothesis.

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  7. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  8. Complex societies precede moralizing gods throughout world historyWhitehouse, Harvey - Nature, 2019 - 3 Hypotheses

    Researchers tackle the moral gods hypothesis which proposes that moral gods enabled large-scale societies to evolve. They use 414 societies spanning 10,000 years in Seshat: Global History Databank and code 51 measures of social complexity and four measures of moral gods. The findings of the present study challenge the moral gods hypothesis. In the societies studied, complex societies appear to precede moral gods rather than the inverse of moral gods preceding complex societies.

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  9. Decrepitude and death-hastening: the nature of old age in third world societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Studies in Third World Societies, 1982 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines the status and treatment of the elderly in non-industrial societies. Associations are found between social complexity, subsistence type, and the status and treatment of the elderly.

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  10. Murder and suicide in forty non-literate societiesPalmer, Stuart - Journal of Criminal Law, Criminology and Police Science, 1965 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper tests assumptions regarding the inverse relationship between murder and suicide. Analysis suggests that murder and suicide in fact vary together, and they are also positively associated with overall punishment in a society.

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