Found 500 Documents across 50 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Cultural patterning of sexual beliefs and behaviorMinturn, Leigh - Ethnology, 1969 - 12 Hypotheses

    This paper is concerned with the variation in sexual behavior in humans. Authors test hypotheses regarding the relationships between sexual behaviors and beliefs concerning sex.

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  2. The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypothesesMinturn, Leigh - Mothers of six cultures: antecedents of child rearing, 1964 - 5 Hypotheses

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  3. The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural studyMinturn, Leigh - Medical Anthropology, 1984 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  4. Birth order in cross-cultural perspectiveRosenblatt, Paul C. - Developmental Psychology, 1974 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  5. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  6. Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspectiveBaunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender Issues, 2001 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

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  7. Population growth, society, and culture: an inventory of cross-culturally tested causal hypothesesSipes, Richard G. - , 1980 - 51 Hypotheses

    This book examines population growth rate and its correlates by testing 274 hypotheses (derived from multiple theories) with an 18-society sample. Forty-one of these hypotheses were significant at the .05 level, leading the author to accept these relationships as reflective of the real world. The 274 hypotheses are grouped into 51 broader hypotheses, and marked by (*) where relationships are significant as designated by the author or by significance p < 0.05.

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  8. A cross-cultural linguistic analysis of freudian symbolsMinturn, Leigh - Cross-Cultural Studies, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines dream symbols that are classified by gender. Tests of six languages from six branches suggest that objects that appear as male or female dream symbols are represented by corresponding gendered words (i.e. masculine or feminine nouns).

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  9. The politics of birth practices: a strategic analysisPaige, Karen - American Sociological Review, 1973 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines cross-cultural variation in customary birth practices for men and women, testing a general hypothesis that birth practices represent tactics in negotiations over paternity. Data supports this hypothesis, and a series of related variables are tested in bivariate analysis and path analysis. Findings suggest that compensation demands at birth are associated with maternal restrictions from paternity-related agreements (e.g. maternal seclusion during birth), and fraternal interest groups are associated with the husband’s ritual involvement at birth (e.g. demonstration of the couvade).

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  10. Illegitimacy and social structures: cross-cultural perspectives on nonmarital birthHendrix, Lewellyn - , 1996 - 13 Hypotheses

    This book investigates sanctions for nonmarital conceptions or birth. The author conducts cross-cultural tests for hypotheses derived from a variety of theories. Results do not support one theory over another, but suggest that variables such as sociocultural complexity, family structure, descent, fraternal interest groups, sexual inequality, and child-parent relationships all affect the consequences of illegitimacy.

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