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  1. Peace between participatory polities: a cross-cultural test of the "democracies rarely fight each other" hypothesisEmber, Carol R. - World Politics, 1992 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article tests the effects of variables associated with political participation on the frequency of internal warfare. Findings suggest support for the hypothesis that democracies rarely fight each other.

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  2. Warfare, atrocities, and political participation: eastern AfricaCarol R. Ember - Journal of Aggression, Conflict, and Peace Research, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    The present study attempts to replicate the Ember, Ember, and Russett (1992) worldwide finding that fighting rarely occurs between democracies in a sample of eastern African societies. Following the earlier study, the authors considered internal warfare to be an analog of international warfare and measures of political participation analogous to democracy. The researchers also explore if there is an association between political participation and committing atrocities. Contrary to past findings, internal warfare was not predicted by the same set of variables as the 1992 study, but there is an inverse relationship between committing atrocities and political participation. However, when additional variables were added, internal warfare was significantly predicted by less political participation.

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  3. Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on war and aggressionEmber, Carol R. - Troubled Times: Violence and Warfare in the Past, 1997 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  4. Political Participation and Long-Term Resilience in Pre-Colombian SocietiesPeter N. Peregrine - Disaster Prevention and Management, 2017 - 7 Hypotheses

    The present study investigates whether there is resilience variability following climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented, which promote participatory and inclusive structures, and exclusionary-oriented, which limit political authority and power. The findings offer modest support for social resilience theory that more flexible (i.e. more participatory) societies would be more resilient after a disaster than less flexible societies. Although only 5 of 14 correlations are significant, the direction is significant by a binomial sign test.

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  5. Inequality and democracy and the anthropological recordEmber, Carol R. - Inequality, democracy, and economic development, 1997 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between equality and democracy, focusing on social stratification and political participation as the primary measures. Results suggest that equality strengthens some aspects of democracy, but several other factors such as industrialization are involved in the relationship.

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  6. Social resilience to nuclear winter: lessons from the Late Antique Little Ice AgePeter Neal Peregrine - Global Security: Health, Science and Policy, 2021 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author analyzes conditions that might favor social resilience during the Late Antique Little Ice Age (ca. 536-556 CE). The assumption is made that climatic conditions in the Northern Hemisphere during this period of time are very similar to those that would occur during a nuclear winter. These conditions include a drop in temperature and decreased solar radiation from volcanic eruptions. Measures for social resilience come from multiple variables for social change, which are tested against measures for type of political engagement. It is argued that broad political participation is correlated with resilience.

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  7. Pathogens and politics: further evidence that parasite prevalence predicts authoritarianismMurray, Damian R. - PLoS ONE, 2013 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article employs cross-national and cross-cultural methods to investigate whether pathogen stress is a direct determinant of authoritarianism. The study controls on other factors such as famine, warfare, and malnutrition and evaluates alternative causal models.

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  8. Evolutionary Models of LeadershipZachary H. Garfield - Human Nature, 2019 - 4 Hypotheses

    Researchers tested four models of leadership for qualities and correlates that could predict the transmission of leadership cross-culturally. Researchers sampled 60 societies from the Probability Sample Files, coding for 24 variables. Support was found for the prevalence of the collective action model and the prestige model, with a lack of support found for the dominance leadership model.

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  9. Political institutionalization in primitive societies: a hologeistic analysisHill, Kim - Cross-Cultural Research, 1979 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines socio-economic predictors of political complexity. Findings suggest that class stratification is the most significant predictor of political complexity.

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  10. Archaeology of slavery from cross-cultural perspectiveHrnčíř, Václav - Cross-Cultural Research, 2017 - 8 Hypotheses

    The authors examine correlations between slavery and variables that can potentially be detected archaeologically. The authors do not test specific hypotheses, but aim to explore the variables in a broader sense. As such, the authors use a grounded theory approach to data analysis in order to examine trends that emerge from the data itself.

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