Found 51 Documents across 6 Pages (0.001 seconds)
  1. The role of pre-mastication in the evolution of complementary feeding strategies: a bio-cultural analysisZhang, Yuanyuan - , 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    This thesis uses a cross-cultural sample to examine the relationship between anemia and infant feeding practices. Examples from the ethnography are presented. Findings are largely descriptive on practice, but are largely inconclusive with regard to anemia.

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  2. Population size and cultural evolution in nonindustrial food-producing societiesCollard, Mark - PLOS ONE, 2013 - 1 Hypotheses

    Seeking to resolve contradictions between previous studies, these authors conduct empirical analysis on the relationship between population size and cultural evolution. Results indicate that population size influences toolkit richness and complexity, even when proxies for risk of resource failure are introduced in the regression model. Authors speculate that the association is weaker for hunter-gatherers because those societies are more affected by risk of resource failure and have institutions that facilitate cultural evolution despite smaller population size. There also may be a threshold effect in the influence of population size on toolkit structure.

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  3. Human-pet dynamics in cross-cultural perspectiveGray, Peter B. - Anthrozoos, 2010 - 0 Hypotheses

    The data in this study attempts to address questions related to cross-cultural similarities and differences in human-pet dynamics. A distribution of pet types across a cross-cultural sample is provided, along with descriptions of the functions and treatment of pets cross-culturally.

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  4. Network strategy and warPeregrine, Peter N. - Alternative Pathways to Complexity: Households, Markets, World Systems, and Political Economy: Essays Honoring the Legacy of Richard E. Blanton - 3 Hypotheses

    This article draws from previous research by Ember and Ember (1992) that suggests a relationship between socialization for mistrust in others, unpredictable natural disasters, and warfare frequency. Authors hypothesize that the inclusion of a corporate-network strategy variable will improve the predictive power of the Embers' model for warfare. Results support this hypothesis.

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  5. Cultural adaptations after progressionismMcCall, Lauren W. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2009 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article challenges ideas of cultural progressionism through an analysis of counting systems. Cultural adaptation in both biotic and abiotic environments is examined, and results suggest that culture adapts to both the human-made environment and the physical environment. The author asserts that “interpreting divergent and convergent behaviors as due to differences and similarities of local environments” is superior to a progressionist approach to cultural change (62).

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  6. Environment, cooking strategies and containersNelson, Kit - Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 2010 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines cooking strategies and cooking containers cross-culturally. Focusing on stone boiling and direct fire cooking, the authors find that geographic location and climate (particularly temperature, rainfall, and evapotranspiration) will be associated with cooking strategy. Container fabric type was also examined, and was found to be associated with cooking strategy, climatic variables, and subsistence type.

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  7. Bribery in preindustrial societies: understanding the universalism-particularism puzzleRothstein, Bo - Journal of Anthropological Research, 2014 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how ideas of "public" and "private" goods can account for bribery and corruption. The authors hypothesize that societies that have a clear distinction between public and private goods will experience less corruption and societies with a more ambiguous distinction between public and private goods will experience more corruption. Findings mostly support this hypothesis.

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  8. The cultural morphospace of ritual form: examining modes of religiosity cross-culturallyAtkinson, Quentin D. - Evolution and Human behavior, 2011 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the frequency and emotional arousal of ritual. Cross-cultural tests support the existence of two modes of religiosity: doctrinal, with high frequency and low emotionality of ritual, and imagistic, with low frequency and high emotionality of ritual. Both euphoric and dysphoric arousal are considered. Associations between these two modes of religiosity and other features of culture (such as group size and the use of agriculture) are examined.

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  9. Causes, consequences, and kin bias of human group fissionsWalker, Robert S. - Human Nature, 2014 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines instances of group fission cross-culturally. Results suggest that internal political conflict and resource scarcity are the two most common causes of group fission. Results also suggest that group fission tends to occur along kin lines.

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  10. Social risk-management strategies in pastoral systems: a qualitative comparative analysisMoritz, Mark - Cross-Cultural Research, 2011 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the different social risk-management strategies (SRMS) used by pastoralists to minimize their exposure to risks that may affect their livelihood. The authors identify a new type of SRMS, noninstitutionalized SRMS, to the two existing types, exchange networks and patron-client relations. A qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) is used to identify factors which explain the variation in SRMS: livelihood diversification, economic differentiation, political economy, risk exposure, and key economic animal.

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