Found 162 Documents across 17 Pages (0.001 seconds)
  1. Modernization as changes in cultural complexity: new cross-cultural measurementsDivale, William Tulio - Cross-Cultural Research, 2001 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article considers the consequences of modernization. Factor analysis is used to identify four stages of modernization: 1) changes in education, government, and trade; 2) changes in health, technology, and transportation; 3) changes in family, religion, and toilet; and 4) changes in behavior. The authors then consider five trends they expect to be associated with modernization and test whether they develop over the course of the four stages. Results indicate that these 5 trends—increased cultural complexity, female status, pacification, suicide, and social stress—are associated with only the first and fourth stages.

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  2. Co-wife conflict and co-operationJankowiak, William - Ethnology, 2005 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article offers an exploratory study of the structural and psychological influences related co-wife conflict and cooperation.

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  3. Femme fatale and status fatale: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Cross-Cultural Research, 2000 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study documents the phenomenon of the 'femme fatale' (a dangerous woman) and 'status fatale' (a dangerous man) cross-culturally. The 'femme fatale' motif is practically universal. Data supports the idea that emotional involvement, rather than sexual gratification, was the primary motivation for seeking out a stranger of the opposite sex. A literature review is provided.

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  4. Individual and societal response to sexual betrayal: a view from around the worldJankowiak, William - Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality, 2007 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study tests several hypotheses that men and women are differentially invested in their partner's sexual fidelity. Using a cross-cultural sample authors analyze women's and men's responses to sexual infidelity.

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  5. A cross-cultural perspective on romantic loveJankowiak, William - Ethnology, 1992 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study negates the hypothesis that romantic love is unique to Euro-American culture and provides evidence of romantic love in the majority of cultures sampled.

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  6. Extra-marital affairs: a reconsideration of the meaning and universality of the "double standard"Jankowiak, William - World Cultures, 2002 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines the variation in responses to sexual infidelity and the effect of social complexity and descent on responses to infidelity. Results suggest significant relationships between social complexity, descent, and responses to infidelity

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  7. Managing infidelity: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Ethnology, 2002 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on spousal responses to extramarital affairs cross-culturally. Results suggest that men and women are equally concerned with the sexual activities of their spouses, however, tactics used in response to infidelity vary by gender. Results also show a relationship between social complexity and responses to infidelity.

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  8. Using drug foods to capture and enhance labor performance: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Current Anthropology, 1996 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between drug foods and colonialism in relation to labor and trade. Relationships were found between political complexity, subsistence type, and the use of drug foods as labor and trade enhancers and inducers.

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  9. Is the romantic-sexual kiss a near human universal?Jankowiak, William - American Anthropologist, 2015 - 2 Hypotheses

    The authors examine a world-wide sample of cultures to assess whether the romantic-sexual kiss is a human universal. They also test for an association between romantic-sexual kissing and social complexity.

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  10. Primitive militarismEckhardt, William - Journal of Peace Research, 1975 - 6 Hypotheses

    The reasons "primitive" peoples engaged in warfare are discussed. In order to resolve any inconsistencies in previous studies of warfare, this article looks closely at Textor's (1967) warfare variables and their correlations with other variables included in Textor's (1967) anthropological summary.

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