Found 93 Documents across 10 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Alliances and ritual ecstasy: human responses to resource stressHayden, Brian - Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 1987 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article hypothesizes that ritual ecstasy was selected for as a way for hunter-gatherers to cope with resource uncertainty by unifying separate groups. Results support this hypothesis and suggest a relationship between resource stress and deities as well as dependence on animals and presence of zoomorphic deities.

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  2. Ecological determinants of women's status among hunter/gatherersHayden, Brian - Human Evolution, 1986 - 4 Hypotheses

    A materialist approach is used to study the status of women in hunter-gatherer groups. Techno-ecological factors are tested as predictors of women's status.

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  3. Astronomy in the Upper PalaeolithicHayden, Brian - Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 2011 - 4 Hypotheses

    Researchers examine the ethnographic record, sampling 82 hunter gatherer societies from the HRAF World Cultures database, for cross-cultural patterns of archaeological evidence of knowledge of astronomy and constellations. Surveying the data, researchers identified many patterns in the upper paleolithic, noting the importance of further examination of this topic.

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  4. Types of family and types of economyNimkoff, M. F. - American Journal of Sociology, 1960 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article posits that nuclear, independent families are more common under certain economic conditions that affect food supply, demand for family labor, physical mobility, and property system. Empirical analysis suggests that nuclear, independent families are associated with hunting and gathering subsistence type and low social stratification.

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  5. Types of family and The social system and the familyNimkoff, M. F. - Comparative Family Systems, 1965 - 4 Hypotheses

    The author uses a world-wide sample of societies to address variation in famiy organization and the economic and social factors to which it relates.

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  6. Matri-patrilocality and the birth of the first childWilson, Suzanne F. - Being Female: Reproduction, Power and Change, 1975 - 2 Hypotheses

    The goal of this paper is two-fold: first, a review of some of the suggestions that anthropologists have made to improve classifications of residence is presented. Second, matri-patrilocality is examined in order to illustrate the importance of considering life cycle events in interpretations of residence patterns.

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  7. Internal war: a cross-cultural studyOtterbein, Keith F. - American Anthropologist, 1968 - 9 Hypotheses

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  8. Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspectiveAberle, David F. - Matrilineal Kinship, 1961 - 15 Hypotheses

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  9. An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth: a cross-cultural study of feudingOtterbein, Keith F. - American Anthropologist, 1965 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the presence of feuding, arguing that a solely evolutionary or functional approach misses important inter-societal factors. Results indicate that while fraternal interest groups are associated with feuding, the presence of war and level of political integration also increase the likelihood of feuding.

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  10. Comment on 'correlates of political complexity'Otterbein, Keith F. - American Sociological Review, 1971 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article answers questions raised by Abrahamson (1969) about the relationship between warfare and political complexity. Significant correlations were found between political complexity and the frequency of being attacked and between frequency of attacking and military success.

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