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  1. Folktale transmission in the arctic provides evidence for high bandwidth social learning among hunter–gatherer groupsRoss, Robert M. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2016 - 4 Hypotheses

    The myths, legends, and folktales of nearby groups tend to more alike than those of more distant groups. Three competing models attempt to explain this distribution of cultural traits: (1) vertical transmission, (2) horizontal transmission, and (3) independent innovation. The authors examine 18 Arctic hunter-gatherer groups to quantify the extent to which geographic distance, cultural ancestry, and effective population size predict overlap in folktale inventories.

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  2. The sun and the moon in cross-cultural perspectiveMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2015 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article compares the relative importance of the sun vs. the moon for a world-wide sample of societies. The contexts in which the sun and the moon are found important are also compared.

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  3. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  4. The dependency-conflict hypothesis and the frequency of drunkennessBacon, Margaret K. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1974 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study is a reexamination of Bacon's (1965) previous cross-cultural study regarding drinking. The current study supports the dependency-conflict hypothesis that frequency of drunkenness is related to dependency needs in childhood and adulthood.

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  5. Female aggression in cross-cultural perspectiveBurbank, Victoria K. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1987 - 1 Hypotheses

    Female aggression, reasons and targets of that aggression are described using a cross-cultural sample. It is suggested that female aggression is often a means of competing for men or subsistence products, but it also may be a means of defense.

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  6. A cross-cultural study of correlates of crimeBacon, Margaret K. - Journal of Abnormal and social Psychology, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    Causal factors to the development of crime are examined. Frequency of theft and personal crime are tested against these causal factors in a search for correlations.

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  7. Subsistence variables: a comparison of textor and sauerBrown, Judith K. - Ethnology, 1970 - 3 Hypotheses

    Textor's (1967) A Cross-Cultural Summary is used to test a variety of Sauer's (1952) hypotheses concerning the sequence of agricultural developments. Tests are primarily focused on subsistence variables.

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  8. Being in charge: older women and their younger female kinBrown, Judith K. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, 1994 - 4 Hypotheses

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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  9. A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of cultureBacon, Margaret K. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Suppl., 1965 - 12 Hypotheses

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  10. The evolutionary forms of the religious life: a cross-cultural, quantitative analysisSanderson, Stephen K. - American Anthropologist, 2008 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article develops a new measure of religious evolution and uses multivariate statistical techniques to examine correlates of different religious stages. Results suggest that subsistence economy, societal size, and the presence of writing and records are all associated with the evolution toward monotheism.

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