Found 156 Documents across 16 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. The evolution of human female sexuality: a cross-cultural perspectiveEmber, Carol R. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1984 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper suggests a tentative analysis of continuous female sexual receptivity based on a random sample of mammals and birds. It is suggested that humans developed continuous female sexual receptivity because humans have the unusual combination of long infant dependency, group living, and male-female bonding.

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  2. Climate, econiche, and sexuality: influences on sonority in languageEmber, Carol R. - American Anthropologist, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on environmental and social explainations for variations in sonority. As expected, results suggest that climate, vegetation density, and sexuality are associated with sonority.

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  3. Father absence and male aggression: a re-examination of the comparative evidenceEmber, Carol R. - Ethos, 2002 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper supports Beatrice B. Whiting's (1965) sex-identity conflict hypothesis which suggests a relationship between males' early identification with their mothers and male violence. Authors find that, in addition to socialization aggression, frequency of homicide/assault is significantly related to father-infant sleeping distance, particularly when residence is not matrilocal and/or warfare is more than occasional.

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  4. High CV score: regular rhythm or sonority?Ember, Carol R. - American Anthropologist, 2000 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article is a response to Munroe, Fought, and Fought's comments on a previous study of sonority and climate. Authors suggest that the three indices used by Munroe, Fought, and Fought to measure sonority are not the same contruct and present new results that indicate an association between climate, topography, and vowel index.

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  5. Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on war and aggressionEmber, Carol R. - Troubled Times: Violence and Warfare in the Past, 1997 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  6. War, socialization, and interpersonal violence: a cross-cultural studyEmber, Carol R. - The Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1994 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study explores several correlates of interpersonal violence. Multiple regression analysis suggests that socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood is the strongest predictor of higher rates of homicide and assault. Path analysis suggests that socialization for aggression is a consequence, not a cause, of war.

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  7. War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary modelsEmber, Carol R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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  8. The conditions favoring multilocal residenceEmber, Carol R. - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1972 - 5 Hypotheses

    This paper presents empirical evidence suggesting that multilocal residence is most common in societies that have experienced depopulation, likely due to the introduction of a new infectious disease. Other potential explanatory variables—such as the presence of migratory bands, little or no agriculture, and equality of the sexes in inheritance—were not significant predictors of multilocal residence when controlling for depopulation.

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  9. Gender-based social groupsEmber, Carol R. - Encyclopedia of Sex and Gender, 2003 - 0 Hypotheses

    This article reviews the literature referring to patterns of marital residence. Discussions include the psychological consequences for the individuals involved, variations in marital residence patterns, explanations of the types of kin or descent groups developed in response to varying marital residence patterns, unisex associations, and consequences of gender-based social organizations.

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  10. Resource Unpredictability, mistrust, and war: a cross-cultural studyEmber, Carol R. - The Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1992 - 6 Hypotheses

    The article tests theories that may explain why warfare frequency varies from society to society. The focus is on ecological problems, particularly different kinds of resource scarcity, but social and psychological theories are also tested with both bivariate and multivariate analyses. Because unpredictable disasters are such a strong predictor in nonstate societies, the authors theorize that war may mostly be caused by a fear of nature.

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