Found 140 Documents across 14 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. War and social organization: from nomadic bands to modern statesFry, Douglas P. - Beyond War: The Human Potential for Peace, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    In this chapter of 'Beyond War,' Douglas critiques previous codes of warfare to make a distinction between feuding and warring. A test of warfare and level of social complexity among hunter-gatherers is conducted. Results indicate that complex hunter-gatherers make war while a majority of simple hunter-gatherers do not.

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  2. Social organization matters!Fry, Douglas P. - The Human Potential for Peace: an anthropological challenge to assumptions about war and violence, 2006 - 1 Hypotheses

    This chapter includes cross-cultural tests of the relationship between social complexity of hunter-gatherer groups and warfare. Results suggest that more complex and equestrian hunter-gatherer societies tend to be more war-like and less complex hunter gatherer societies tend to be more peaceful.

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  3. Lethal aggression in mobile forager bands and implications for the origins of warFry, Douglas P. - Science, 2013 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the incidence of warfare in mobile forager band societies. Data analysis suggests that the majority of lethal aggression in such societies can be classified as homicide. Feuding is common and warfare a definite minority. The authors offer several reasons why warfare would be uncommon in such societies: residence, descent, subsistence strategy, and social order are all cited.

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  4. Beyond war: the human potential for peaceFry, Douglas P. - , 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    This book investigates peaceful societies and the social and ecological conditions that discourage war. The author uses ethnographic examples, cross-cultural findings, primatology, and archaeology to examine war, social organization, human evolution, and conflict management.

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  5. Societies within peace systems avoid war and build positive intergroup relationshipsFry, Douglas P. - Humanities & Social Sciences Communications, 2021 - 4 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors explore cultural variables that they propose contribute to the maintenance of peace in non-warring societies. These variables are compared in 16 peaceful systems (as coded by the authors from anthropological and historical data) and in 30 warring societies taken from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS). Findings associate more peaceful cultures with peace systems, and non-peaceful cultures with warring societies.

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  6. Causes of polygyny: ecology, economy, kinship, and warfareWhite, Douglas R. - American Anthropologist, 1988 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article uses two dependent variables: acceptance of polygyny (the rules) and and the percentage of women in polygynous marriages (the behavior). The rules of marriage are best predicted by social structural variables (e.g. warfare, fraternal interest groups) whereas actual marriage behaviors are best predicted by economic and ecological variables (e.g. climate zone). Deemphasizing exclusively reproductive or economic explanations for polygyny, the authors find polygyny is related to male-oriented kin groups, territorial expansion and migration, and marrying war captives. Polygyny is thus thought to have a stratifying effect on women and is ultimately a detriment to female status.

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  7. Entailment theory and method: a cross-cultural analysis of the sexual division of laborWhite, Douglas R. - Behavior Science Research, 1977 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article discusses constraints on role behavior that affect the division of labor, focusing on women’s childcare responsibilities, the nature of production sequences, and occupational specialization. The authors employ entailment analysis to examine 50 activities; results suggest three findings: 1) men are more likely to be assigned tasks that require travel and exposure to danger, 2) men are more likely to perform tasks that are early in the production sequence, and 3) if women perform a task at an early stage of production, they are more likely to perform subsequent tasks.

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  8. Grid-Group Analysis, Social Capital, and Entrepreneurship Among North American Ethnic GroupsCaulkins, D. Douglas - Cross-Cultural Research, 2002 - 2 Hypotheses

    Building on previous explorations of grid/group analysis for cross-cultural research (Caulkins 1999), the researchers test for relationships between grid/group variables and measures of social capital among nine North American ethnic groups. The article contributes to a discussion of whether the primary source of economically productive social capital is the general ethnic group ("ethnicity as social capital" hypothesis) or the family unit ("family as social capital" hypothesis), using group, grid, and census data on self-employment as indicators. The authors conclude that their results are consistent with the "family as social capital" hypothesis.

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  9. Is Mary Douglas's Grid/Group Analysis Useful for Cross-Cultural Research?Caulkins, D. Douglas - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 1 Hypotheses

    In this article, the researcher aims to test the usefulness of grid/group theory, developed by anthropologist Mary Douglas, for cross-cultural research. The article utilizes principal component factor analysis on grid/group indicators to test if "grid" and "group" can be considered as sufficiently independent factors, and thus useful for quantitative cross-cultural research.

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  10. Rethinking polygyny: co-wives, codes, and cultural systemsWhite, Douglas R. - Current Anthropology, 1988 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article "focuses on internal relationships in the organization of polygynous systems." The author presents new codes for polygyny and tests hypotheses regarding "complexes" of polygynous variables: wealth-increasing polygyny and sororal polygyny. It is asserted that polygyny is produced by a variety of factors and circumstances, and that regional historical, demographic, and ecological forces require attention in order to understand its acceptance and practice.

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