Found 104 Documents across 11 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Notes on technology and the moral orderGouldner, Alvin W. - The Advanced Studies Series, 1962 - 7 Hypotheses

    Using empirical data and statistical methodology, Gouldner and Peterson aim to identify fundamental dimensions across societies, examine the relationships among these dimensions, and evaluate their importance. Data analysis is largely based on factor analysis, and the authors discuss how statistical methods fit into functional social theory.

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  2. Relationships between subsistence and age at weaning in "preindustrial" societiesSellen, Daniel W. - Human Nature, 2001 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests the weaning food availability hypothesis, that both the introduction of foods other than breastmilk and the cessation of breastfeeding will vary by society's subsistence type. This hypothesis has implications for demography, as accelerated weaning can lead to increases in both mothers' fertility (due to decreased birth intervals) and infant mortality (due to the presence of pathogens in new foods).

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  3. Fertility and mode of subsistence: a phylogenetic analysisSellen, Daniel W. - Current Anthropology, 1997 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study tests for a relationship between subsistence type and fertility using phylogenetic and statistical analyses. The authors find a clear relationship between dependence on agriculture and fertility among non-permanently settled groups.

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  4. Pathogen prevalence and human mate preferencesGangestad, Steven W. - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1993 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the relationship between pathogen prevalence and mate selection. Results show that increased pathogen prevalence is significantly associated with an increased importance in the physical attractiveness of potential mates.

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  5. Exchange theory and sexual permissivenessEckhardt, Kenneth W. - Behavior Science Notes, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    "An exchange theory of social behavior is advanced to explain intersocietal differences in sex codes…[Results indicate] modest support for the thesis that the location of power and resources as they influence social interaction and exchange are contributory forces in accounting for the level of sexual permissiveness found in society" (1).

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  6. Toward monogamy: a cross-cultural study of correlates of type of marriageOsmond, Marie W. - Social Forces, 1965 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study presents a sociological theory of marriage type based on socioeconomic organization. Results suggest that intensive agriculture, more stratification, greater political integration, a fixed settlement pattern, a larger population, and greater labor specialization tended to be correlates of monogamy.

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  7. A cross-cultural analysis of family organizationOsmond, Marie W. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study uses a multiple regression analysis to examine the relationship between society type and several variables of societal organization. Results suggest that limited family type is more likely to be found in complex societies.

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  8. Love magic and socialization anxiety: a cross-cultural studyShirley, Robert W. - American Anthropologist, 1962 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study looks at the relationship between the presence of love magic in a society and sexual anxiety. Results show support for the hypothesis that love magic is positively correlated with sexual anxiety.

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  9. Menstrual taboos and social rigidityYoung, Frank W. - Cross-Cultural Approaches, 1967 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study first reviews two explanations of menstrual taboos: taboos as an aspect of social rigidity and a psychogenic interpretation of menstrual taboos. The authors chiefly advocate a sociogenic explanation of menstrual taboos.

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  10. More 'altruistic' punishment in larger societiesMarlowe, Frank W. - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2008 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between population size (and complexity) and the level of third-party punishment in economic games. Results demonstrate that people in larger, more complex societies engage in significantly more third-party punishment than people in small-scale societies.

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