Found 170 Documents across 17 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Human-pet dynamics in cross-cultural perspectiveGray, Peter B. - Anthrozoos, 2010 - 0 Hypotheses

    The data in this study attempts to address questions related to cross-cultural similarities and differences in human-pet dynamics. A distribution of pet types across a cross-cultural sample is provided, along with descriptions of the functions and treatment of pets cross-culturally.

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  2. Evolutionary and cross-cultural perspectives on gamblingGray, Peter B. - Journal of Gambling Studies, 2004 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study uses evolutionary theory to hypothesize about the association between age, gender, and gambling. Results suggest that males are more frequent and riskier gamblers than females and that young adults are more likely to have gambling problems than people of other age classes.

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  3. A new cross-cultural study of drunkennessField, Peter B. - Society, Culture and Drinking Patterns, 1962 - 11 Hypotheses

    This book chapter builds on Horton's 1943 psychoanalytical study of drunkenness. The author tests an overall theory that drunkenness, which facilitates personal and uninhibited interactions, is more acceptable, and therefore prevalent, in societies with loose, rather than rigid, social relationships. Indicators of social rigidity, such as strict socialization or male dominance through patrilocality, are tested for relationships to drunkenness.

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  4. An anthropological perspective on obesityBrown, Peter J. - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1987 - 2 Hypotheses

    The authors implement an anthropological approach to explore the evolutionary and cultural explanations of modern obesity. Three widely accepted facts are considered: (1) gender dimorphism (women having higher levels of fat), (2) increase of obesity with modernization, and (3) a positive association between obesity and socioeconomic status. Using theory, cross-cultural research, and case studies, the authors hypothesize how obesity may have been selected for (or not selected against) in an evolutionary context considering both biological and social factors.

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  5. Social resilience to climate-related disasters in ancient societies: a test of two hypothesesPeregrine, Peter N. - , 2017 - 2 Hypotheses

    In the present study, Peregrine tests two perspectives regarding social resilience to climate-related disasters: 1) that societies with more inclusive and participatory political structures (corporate political strategies) are more resilient to climate-related disasters, and 2) that societies with tighter adherence to social norms are more resilient to climate-related disasters. Results support the notion that societies with greater political participation are more socially resilient to catastrophic climate-related disasters. Because these results are justifiably generalizable across multiple historical and cultural contexts, Peregrine's findings are a useful contribution to aid in disaster response policy decision making.

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  6. Cross-language parallels in parental kin termsMurdock, George Peter - Anthropological Linguistics, 1959 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the universal tendency for languages, regardless of their historical relationships, to develop similar words for mother and father on the basis of nursery forms. Findings suggest that Ma, Na, Pa, and Ta are significantly more common sound classes denoting the mother or father.

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  7. Factors in the division of labor by sex: a cross-cultural analysisMurdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1973 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article investigates factors influencing the division of labor by gender, including occupation specialization, the type of material labor involves, the presence of the plow, nomadism, and the advantage that a product may yield to either sex. Hypotheses are widely supported.

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  8. Settlement patterns and community organization: cross-cultural codes 3Murdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1972 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article investigates residence, descent rules, and family structure. Empirical analysis suggests that they are associated with settlement patterns, particularly economic and demographic variables.

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  9. An apologia of george peter murdock. Division of labor by gender and postmarital residence in cross-cultural prespective: a reconsiderationKorotayev, Andrey V. - World Cultures, 2001 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses put forth by Murdock that female contribution to subsistence is associated with matrilocal residence.

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  10. Marital residence and local endogamy: environmental knowledge or leadershipKloos, Peter - American Anthropologist, 1963 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article reviews interpretations of an established relationship between matrilocal residence, sedentarism, and local endogamy. The author offers an interpretation focused on succession of leadership in matrilocal societies: exogamy will be associated with achieved status while endogamy will be associated with a matrilineal succession of authority.

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