Found 93 Documents across 10 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Effects of infant-carrying practices on rhythm in musicAyres, Barbara - Ethos, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper hypothesizes that cross-cultural variation in rhythm is related to variation in infant carrying practices. Suggestions are made regarding the psychological origin of rhythm as well as the function and importance of music in human experience.

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  2. Bride theft and raiding for wives in cross-cultural perspectiveAyres, Barbara - Anthropological Quarterly, 1974 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article seeks to examine the distribution and frequency of bride-theft. Tylor's (1889) findings between various forms of marriage by capture and certain other social instituions are confirmed.

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  3. Intra-societal variation in the incidence of polygynyAyres, Barbara - , 1983 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper explores the relationship between polygyny and societal rank. Results suggest that the higher a male's rank, the higher the incidence of polygyny.

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  4. Marriage systems as reproductive strategies: cross-cultural evidence for sexual selection in manAyres, Barbara - , 1976 - 0 Hypotheses

    The author argues for the use of sexual selection as a theoretical framework to give meaning to the various cross-cultural studies that show significant association between form of marriage (polygyny vs. monogamy) and other cultural, social, and personality variables. The author suggests that "marriage systems reflect individual reproductive strategies."

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  5. Age of assignment of roles and responsibilities to childrenRogoff, Barbara - Human Development, 1975 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study tested for cross-cultural patterns in the age at which societies "assume responsibility or teachability in children or assign a more mature social, sexual, or cultural role [to children]” (353). Out of 27 variables measuring the assignment of roles and responsibilities to children, 16 showed “a modal cultural assignment of social responsibility in the 5- to 7-year age range” (353).

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  6. Effects of infantile stimulation on musical behaviorAyres, Barbara - Folk Song Style and Culture, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    This chapter tests the influences of physiological stressors during infancy on different aspects of musical behavior. Findings suggest that songs in societies where infantile stress is practiced will be characterized by stronger accents and a wider range.

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  7. Pregnancy magic: a study of food taboos and sex avoidancesAyres, Barbara - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter attempts to explain why the number, importance, and duration of food and sex taboos during pregnancy vary cross-culturally. The author hypothesizes that differences in child socialization will be associated with differences in food taboos, and differences in sexual behavior and sanctions will be associated with sex taboos. Results support the hypotheses.

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  8. A cross-cultural study of expressive and instrumental role complementarity in the familyCrano, Joel - American Sociological Review, 1978 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the claim that male and female investment in the socioemotional and economic aspects of family life are inversely related. Results suggest that this hypothesis is not supported, although a significant inverse relationship between male and female infant care does exist.

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  9. A re-examination of the cross-cultural principles of task segregation and sex role differentiation in the familyCrano, Joel - American Sociological Review, 1975 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines Parsons' and Bales' proposition that a universal feature of social structure is gender sex role specialization of tasks. Results suggest that women contribute substantially to the subsistence economy across many domains, casting doubt on such universality.

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  10. How we recognize angry and happy emotion in people, places, and thingsAronoff, Joel - Cross-Cultural Research, 2006 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article presents a series of tests done to determine which geometric patterns in the features of masks, classical ballet, and 17th-century Dutch art evoke emotions of threat. Results suggest that diagonal and angular forms evoke emotions of threat.

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