Found 92 Documents across 10 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Conjugal power and spousal resources in patriarchal culturesLee, Gary R. - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1983 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article reviews theories of marital power and tests for a relationship between wives’ contribution to subsistence and their conjugal power in patriarchal cultures. Results indicate a positive association. The role of cultural complexity is also considered; its relationship with wives’ power is negative and linear while its relationship with wives’ contribution to subsistence is negative and non-linear.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Social organization, spousal resources, and marital power: a cross-cultural studyWarner, Rebecca L. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1986 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines the effect of family structural complexity, residence and descent system, and female contribution to subsistence on women's power in marriage. Results suggest that wives have more power in marriage where there is nuclear family organization and matrilocality. The authors suggest that resource theory should broaden its conception of valued resources to include dimensions such as family organization patterns.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Status of the elderly: an extension of the theoryIshii-Kuntz, Masako - Journal of Marriage and Family, 1987 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article reassesses the cross-cultural work on status of the elderly and tests two additional variables, socialization values and ancestor worship, as predictors of the status of the elderly.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Marital structure and economic systemsLee, Gary R. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1979 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structureLee, Gary R. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. What hunters do for a living, or, how to make out on scarce resourcesLee, Richard B. - Man the Hunter, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze thesubsistence activities of the Kung Bushmen. These activities are then used as a benchmark for comparing other hunting and gathering societies. A cross-cultural analysis asks: To what extent are the Bushmen typeical of hunter-gatherers in general? Finding suggets that, as a less reliable subsistence source, hunting is only used as the primarily subsistence strategy when there is no alternative viable subsistence strategy. Findings also suggest that hunting is the dominant mode of subsistence only in the highest latitudes.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Family structure and the status of the elderly: a preliminary empirical studyLee, Gary R. - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1979 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines the status of the elderly cross-culturally, proposing that familial complexity, unlineal descent, and unilocal residence are predictors of high status. The authors theorize that elderly male status will be highest in patrilineal and patrilocal societies; elderly female status will be highest in matrilineal and matrilocal societies. Some support is found for these patterns, but the authors ultimately regard them as too simple to adequately predict status of the elderly.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Status of the elderly: economic and familial antecedentsLee, Gary R. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how status of the elderly is affected by economic type, family organization, inheritance of real property, and unilocal residence patterns. Multivariate analysis ultimately suggests that agricultural economy, patrilocal residence, and fully extended family systems are significant predictors of higher status of the elderly. No major gender differences were discovered.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Social structure, socialization values, and disciplinary techniques: a cross-cultural analysisPetersen, Larry R. - Journal of Marriage and Family, 1982 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on the relationship between the use of physical punishment during child socialization and the amount of supervision that adults experience. The authors analyze data using a path analysis which suggests that the greater the valuation of conformity relative to self-reliance, the greater the use of physical punishment during child socialization. Precursors of conformity are also suggested.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Supervision and conformity: a cross-cultural analysis of parental socialization valuesEllis, Godfrey J. - The American Journal of Sociology, 1978 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article investigates child socialization toward obedience and conformity as a function of the supervision that parents experience in their own lives. Measures of economic, familial, political, and religious supervision in parents' lives are examined.

    Related DocumentsCite