Found 168 Documents across 17 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. The achieving societyMcClelland, David C. - , 1961 - 1 Hypotheses

    The cross-cultural test on preindustrial societies is a very minor part of a larger work testing the theory that a psychological factor--need for achievement--plays a large role in understanding economic growth and decline. Most of the work focuses on countries and complex societies in the historical past.

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  2. A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinkingMcClelland, David C. - The Drinking Man, 1972 - 8 Hypotheses

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  3. Relationships among selected child-rearing variables in a cross-cultural sample of 110 societiesZern, David - Developmental Psychology, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines child-training through children's display of individualistic orientations (self-reliance, achievement, and general independence) and/or group orientations (responsibility, nurturance, and obedience). Five sub-categories measure whether each orientation is linked to a child's experience of general pressure or performance anxiety/conflict. Together, these orientations their sub-categories total 30 variables that were correlated; differences in gender were also examined. Results indicate that child-rearing pressure to act one way predicts pressure to act in other ways, and this pattern of interaction between variables did not vary by gender.

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  4. Child-rearing practices and games of strategyZern, David - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1979 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between disequilibrium and cognitive development using measurements of child-rearing, presence of high gods, and games of strategy.

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  5. The role of schooling in socializing and skill-building: a cross-cultural studyZern, David - Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1983 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study examines the role of schooling in socialization processes and cultural complexity, seeking to understand whether schooling is correlated with these variables and/or affects them. The author concludes that school serves as a socializer for young children, a skill developer for older children, and a homogenizing force on societal child-rearing practices.

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  6. Child-rearing practices and societal complexity: effect of disequilibrium on cognitive developmentZern, David S. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between disequilibrium in child-rearing and societal complexity (particularly social complexity rather than technical complexity). The author suggests that child-rearing plays a role in forming cultural dimensions.

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  7. The relationship of certain group-oriented and individualistically oriented child-rearing dimensions to cultural complexity in a cross-cultural sampleZern, David - Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1983 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article tests the relationship between child-training variables and cultural complexity. Attention is paid to different types of socialization pressure (group-oriented versus individual-oriented; the degree of anxiety created by the pressure). Findings suggest that group-oriented socialization promotes societal complexity, but individual-oriented socialization and pressure-induced anxiety do not.

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  8. The fear of death in primitive societiesLester, David - Science Research, 1975 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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  9. Religiousness related to cultural complexity and pressures to obey cultural normsZern, David - Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1984 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between religiousness, child socialization, and cultural complexity. Empirical analysis suggests that there is a positive association between cultural complexity and religiousness, especially ritual. Religiousness was also associated with schooling, one of the child-rearing variables examined. A theoretical discussion concerning religion and intellect is also included.

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  10. Population density in cross-cultural perspectiveLevinson, David - American Ethnologist, 1979 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how population density affects social behavior, particularly whether it is a cause of stress in humans that manifests in pathological behavior or mistreatment of children. Analysis indicates that population density is not a cause of these behaviors, and with some variables (such as with divorce and sexual anxiety), there is a negative association with population density.

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