Found 97 Documents across 10 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Premastication: the second arm of infant and young child feeding for health and survival?Pelto, Gretel H. - Maternal and Child Nutrition, 2009 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study asserts that premastication (the pre-chewing of food for infant feeding) has existed as a cross cultural human universal stemming from the post natal immaturity of infant development and their need to have nutritional supplements to breast milk before they develop the molars necessary to consume an adult diet. Hypotheses are informally tested by sampling 119 cultures from the eHRAf database and looking for frequency of premastication occurrence. About one-third with information on infant feeding mention pre-mastication.

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  2. Household structure and socialization practicesMunroe, Ruth H. - Journal of Social Psychology, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    An earlier study (Minturn & Lambert 1964) found a nonsignificant association between multifamily households and social permisiveness. This article re-tests that association using Barry et al.'s ratings for child socialization practices, finding that having several families in one house tends to decrease socialization pressure on children.

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  3. A cross-cultural studyBlum, Richard H. - Society and Drugs, 1969 - 33 Hypotheses

    This chapter offers an exploratory study that examines the relationships between several culture characterstics, including child socialization practices, social structure, and food production, and mind-altering drug use in non-literate societies. All hypotheses were supported.

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  4. Basic economy and communityGoodenough, Ward H. - Behavior Science Notes, 1969 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper examines relationships among mode of production, sedentarism, and population size. Generally, agricultural societies were found to be sedentary and have larger populations, while migratory societies (such as herders or hunters) had smaller population size.

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  5. Administrative rationality, social setting, and organizational developmentUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - American Journal of Sociology, 1962 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines organizational characteristics associated with administrative rationality, as well as how organizational development differs under varying social or cultural conditions.

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  6. Cultural differences in the perception of geometric illusionsSegall, Marshall H. - Science, 1963 - 1 Hypotheses

    "Data from 15 societies are presented in an effort to show substantial intersocietal differences of two types in susceptibility to geometric optical illusions. The results suggest the existence of different habits of perceptual inference which relate to cultural and ecological factors in the visual environment."

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  7. Factors in the cross-cultural patterning of male homosexuality: a reappraisal of the literatureCrapo, Richard H. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1995 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study argues that different types of homosexuality must be examined separately. Authors focus on mentorship and pathic homosexual behavior and test factors that are associated with these two types of behavior.

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  8. Naming the days of the week: a cross-language study of lexical acculturationBrown, Cecil H. - Current Anthropology, 1989 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper provides a linguistic study of the effect of lexical acculturation on the names given to days of the week. Findings show that loan words are used most frequently adopted for weekend days, followed by the days of the week that are closest to the weekends, and least frequently adopted for the days in the middle of the seven-day cycle.

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  9. Sovereign groups, subsistence activities, and the presence of a high god in primitive societiesSimpson, John H. - The Religious Dimension: New Directions in Research, 1979 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates material and social predictors of belief in a high god. The author introduces a new variable, the inertness of subsistence raw materials, to be compared with Swanson’s (1960) variable representing the number of sovereign groups. Both variables were significant predictors of belief in high gods. Relevant theory is discussed.

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  10. Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustrial peoplesUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - , 1959 - 36 Hypotheses

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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