Found 132 Documents across 14 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Social structure, socialization values, and disciplinary techniques: a cross-cultural analysisPetersen, Larry R. - Journal of Marriage and Family, 1982 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on the relationship between the use of physical punishment during child socialization and the amount of supervision that adults experience. The authors analyze data using a path analysis which suggests that the greater the valuation of conformity relative to self-reliance, the greater the use of physical punishment during child socialization. Precursors of conformity are also suggested.

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  2. Sunlight and cultureFredriksson, Per G. - Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 2021 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article used sub-national, historical and cross-country data to examine if exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) could be a factor in the formation of individualism and collectivism. The study found support, across all data sets, that increased exposure to UV-R is associated to more collectivism within a culture. The authors theorized that UV-R exposure increases the likelihood of eye disease causing higher rates of blindness. With increased levels of blindness, the more emphasis there will be on close family relations and/or increased uncertainty avoidance from out-groups leading to more collectivism in a culture.

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  3. Pathways to social inequalityHaynie, Hannah J. - Evolutionary Human Sciences, 2021 - 4 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors examine pathways to social inequality, specifically social class hierarchy, in 408 non-industrial societies. In a path model, they find social class hierarchy to be directly associated with increased population size, intensive agriculture and large animal husbandry, real property inheritance (unigeniture) and hereditary political succession, with an overall R-squared of 0.45. They conclude that a complex web of effects consisting of environmental variables, mediated by resource intensification, wealth transmission variables, and population size all shape social inequality.

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  4. New cross-cultural perspectives on marriage transactionsHuber, Brad R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2011 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article refines previous research on marriage transactions and offers descriptions of new types of marriage transactions. First, the authors examine the frequency and distribution of marriage transactions. Second,the authors use a bio-cultural approach to examine how differences in male and female reproductive strategies and the kin selection theory are associated with marriage transactions.

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  5. Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspectiveHuber, Brad R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  6. Female status predicts female mate preferences across nonindustrial societiesMoore, Fhionna R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    The effect of female status on women's mate preference in a sample of nonindustrial societies is examined.

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  7. Men's fear of sex with womenEmber, Carol R. - Sex Roles, 1978 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines ecological, social, and psychological theories for men's fear of heterosexual sex in a cross-cultural sample. Findings support the hypotheses and a causal model is presented.

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  8. The evolution of human female sexuality: a cross-cultural perspectiveEmber, Carol R. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1984 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper suggests a tentative analysis of continuous female sexual receptivity based on a random sample of mammals and birds. It is suggested that humans developed continuous female sexual receptivity because humans have the unusual combination of long infant dependency, group living, and male-female bonding.

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  9. Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency of child training processes in preindustrial societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  10. Environmental vs. technological effects on childhood socialization processes: a cross-cultural studyWelch, Michael R. - International Journal of Sociology of the Family, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author expands on the findings of Barry, Bacon, and Child (1959), hypothesizing that type of environment is an intervening variable in the relationship between subsistence type and child training. A multiple classification analysis is used.

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